9/10-9/16

Tasks for this Module:

1. Download the appropriate EdTPA documents. Due by 9/16.

  • Here is the site for EdTPA Resources: https://wordpress.ed.pacificu.edu/edtpa
    • Be sure to watch the videos, read the “Making Good Choices” guide, and download your handbook as soon as you can.
    • The password is pacificedtpa

2. Post your topics of interest on the “Topics” page. Due by 9/16. Then start reading on your topic. 🙂

3. Read this article and come prepared to critique it in class: Computer Adapted CBI_JSETv21n2. You may find these guidelines helpful when you read the article: 3 Critiquing Research. Due by 9/17.

4. Complete Module 1: EDUC_612_Fall_2018_Module_1 and the pdf just in case: EDUC_612_Fall_2018_Module_1. Check applicable due dates in Module 1.

I have started all appropriate threads. Please click the reply button underneath the original thread and so on as you respond to others. Let’s see how this goes…

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any difficulties with this module at all.

Todd

57 Responses to 9/10-9/16

  1. Erika Lincango says:

    What is action research?

    Action Research is a “disciplined process of inquiry conducted by and for those taking the action. The primary reason for engaging in action research is to assist the ‘actor’ in improving and/or refining his or her actions.”1

    Action reach aims on building the reflective practitioner, making progress on schoolwide priorities, and building professional cultures. Among the benefits of implementing action research are professionalize teaching, enhance the motivation and efficacy of a weary faculty, meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body, and achieve success with “standards-based” reforms.

    What makes action research particularly appealing for teachers is that it provides valid and reliable data. Every piece of uncovered data gives the educator confidence and wisdom for the following steps. Although all teaching can be classified as trial and error, action researchers liberate themselves by avoiding the repetition of past mistakes. In addition, it seems that the reporting of action research is often in an informal settings like faculty meeting, and teachers conferences where teachers are contributing with collective knowledge.

    1.- Guiding School Improvement with Action Research, (Sagor, 2000)

    Sagor, R, (2000). Guiding School Improvement with Action Research. Retrived from
    http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/100047/chapters/What-Is-Action-Research%C2%A2.aspx [09/15/18]

  2. Erika Lincango says:

    Question about types of research we use.

    I use qualitative and quantitative research because they complement each other. While qualitative research helps me to understand the underlying reasons, opinions, or motivations, quantitative research provides more structure and statistical data of conclusive findings. I display my quantitative research on infographics to support my qualitative research. This facilitates the decision making process in my quest of taking a well informed course of action.

  3. Erika Lincango says:

    INTRODUCTION

    My name is Erika Lincango. I am a Kitu – Panzaleo indigenous migrant journalist from Ecuador. I hold a degree as Expert on Indigenous Peoples, Human Rights and International Cooperation from the University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain. I am a UO School of Journalism graduate, with degrees in Public Relations and Advertising. I am dedicated to the research and monitoring of the drafting and implementation of the declaration on indigenous peoples rights and human rights violations within indigenous peoples territories. In 2013, I founded Eco Justice Abya Yala an indigenous communication project dedicated to monitoring the rights of Nature, the Mega development projects and the application of the Anti-Terrorist Law within Latino-american countries to criminalize indigenous peoples ancestral demands over the land. I serve as a Delegate of the Assembly of Women and Family of the Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador (CONAIE), as an International Communicator of the Federation of Shuar Nationalities of Pastaza (FENASH-P), and as an International Observer.

    In the education field, I served as Co-director of the UO Women’s Center on multicultural academic development and student leadership empowerment. I served at the 4J district as Interpreter an translator (Spanish to English), as well as Positive Approach to Student Success (PASS) program manager at the Arts and Technology Academy. At the moment, I am serving as 4th grade Spanish Immersion teacher at Buena Vista Elementary School.

    As an idealist, I am convinced that the teacher role is; not only to feed students with information, but also to cultivate students humanity while preparing them for life. Therefore, I am an advocate of intercultural education because this kind of education teach children to respect other people’s views, to deal with each other in a constructive manner and help them develop empathy, which is something they will take with them through to adulthood.As a foreign indigenous student, I experienced hate speech, sexual assault, racism and discrimination myself. Therefore, the idea of collaborating with students on intercultural educational initiatives related to the promotion of cross-cultural understanding is what appeals the most to my personal and professional interests in becoming a teacher. As I am eager to be the cultural liaison between all the interested parties who are pursuing the same dream I have: To end societal oppression by supporting students’ personal growth.

  4. Anna Yoder says:

    Anna Yoder
    Module 1#
    Making Therapy Dogs and Comfort Dogs and Everyday Part of School
    The studies on introducing Therapy Dogs to schools has been proven to reduce stress, tension, sooth student’s and children’s anxiety, and in general elicit “happy” feelings from students. Evidence shows that having therapy and comfort dogs in the schools consistently can go a long way towards improving students’ social and emotional well being.
    Current studies show that having an emotional support dog in schools and classrooms bring out some very basic and important emotions that are especially helpful for children ( and adults) who struggle in social interactions. As well, dogs on campus provide a welcoming tone creating a more positive tone to the day and throughout the day.
    As well, Post Columbine blind studies are showing how highly effective it is to have therapy and emotional support dogs in High Schools and elementary school. Studies show a drop in stress and anxiety level for students as high as 68-87%. Blind studies conducted in schools that had been involved in school shooting were on average twenty percent lower than those unaffected by an active shooting. The studies show, affected by a school shooting or not, having an emotional support dog in your school can provide an enormous drop in the anxiety levels of students and a rise in emotional well being over all.
    Generally, therapy dog programs rely on volunteer organisations. One example is DOGS, with currently have 323 volunteer dog teams in 185 schools across NSW, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, SA, WA, and ACT. In total, they help 1,615 children each week.
    Research into these programs is needed to help further understand the impacts of therapy dogs, especially on student learning and academic outcomes. Lack of funding is setting this research backed university parternships are one solution to address this.
    The second part to this analysis of including Therapy and Comfort dogs in the classrooms or schools will include the affect these highly trained, non-judgmental dogs can have in aiding children with disabilities such as dyslexia, ADD, ADHD, etc. The READ program, whereby children read to dogs is extremely successful in assisting children with varying learning disabilities.
    More specific research to come, more research needed.

  5. Hailey Brown says:

    I would prefer to use both methods (quantitative and qualitative) since they look at things a little differently and allow you to get a more complete picture of what is going on and to answer more complex questions. But if I had to choose only one, I would go with quantitative research since it is more objective and can still be used to answer complex questions with some creativity and statistical manipulation. I personally feel like qualitative research can be more complicated to effectively gather objective data and interpret that data.

  6. Emma Castle says:

    I tend to lean towards qualitative research methods. Coming from a history/art history background, it’s definitely what I’m more comfortable with and what I have the most experience in. I like to use quantitative data in my research papers or as a jumping off point to draw my conclusions, but I’m at a loss when it comes to conducting that research myself. Especially after reading the article for this week, I realized that my mind starts to go blank when I’m reading quantitative data analysis. Hopefully I can learn some tools to overcome that!

  7. Chelsea Hamar says:

    I believe that both qualitative and quantitative research have their own benefits but if I had to choose one, I tend to prefer qualitative research. I was an English major, so numbers are not always my friend. I enjoy qualitative research because it has to do more with the “how” and “why” of things. I find that the information found from qualitative research is much more interesting and rewarding compared to the findings of quantitative research.

  8. Roxie Hetzer says:

    As a teacher I will likely be most interested in action research because compared with qualitative or quantative research, will be the most efficient and effective way of meeting student goals, classroom practice, and/or other school school programs. In teaching, best practice comes sometimes from trial and error, problem solving, and researching of current best practice. In my opinion, collaborating with other teachers and professionals, finding the best program or method(s), researching it thoroughly, making a group decision of appropriate action (if needed), is a smart way to run a classroom and school. In a classroom or school there is usually an urgency to the issue, and I feel action research can help teacher(s) make educated decision.

    I also believe there is an important need for both qualitative and quantitative research, but for teachers leading change, or trying to improve classroom management, action research will likely be best.

  9. Adrienne Colaizzi says:

    The research tradition that I tend to lean toward is
    Qualitative because the approach is of exploration (themes/patterns/organization/development of ideas), that can then lead toward quantitative research for numeric information.

  10. Todd Twyman says:

    What is your definition of action research?

    • Michelle Nelson says:

      I spent some time online researching various explanations of action research, and I would put it in my own words this way: Action research is a form of inquiry used by teachers to improve practices in their own classrooms. It involves observing students and collecting data, and then using that information to solve problems and to help students become better learners. It can be done at an individual level, or as a school or district as a whole.

    • Jill Holden says:

      I also spent a bit of time researching action research, and I would say my definition is – an informal method of direct investigation, observation, analysis, and evaluation that educators use to develop practical solutions to solve problems efficiently or to improve upon an element of their own teaching methods.

    • John Donaldson says:

      I would say that action research would be initiated on the local level to solve the immediate local problem. It’s results are focused on the local area and so would need to be further researched and examined on a larger scale to provide a true finding for the population at large. It’s purpose is to provide answers here and now for a particular group, not the population at large, although it could indeed be true for that application.

    • Maddy Simons says:

      I found action research to be defined as research that is done within a learning environment (classroom, school district etc.), where the barrier between researcher and participant does not exist. The researcher is part of the study being conducted as one of the participants themselves. It seems to me that this would be used for developing new teaching styles within your classroom. Action research is a four step process including planning, action, analysis, and conclusion. Here is the video I found most helpful in defining action research: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ov3F3pdhNkk

    • Leah Cruzen says:

      Action research is a tool that teachers utilize in order to better understand their classroom environment. It is a way to try new things with intention, rather than blindly doing things differently in order to see what happens. Action Research is not only for teachers that are struggling, but also teachers that are doing well and would like to do better. It is an investigative process to find out how students could be learning more and how teachers could be using their time more efficiently. It is a beneficial tool to use in the classroom, as everyones curriculums and environments differ greatly, and other peoples research won’t always apply to your classroom in particular. I will leave you with this quote that I enjoyed from, What Teachers Need to Know About Action Research by Wendi Pillars. The link is provided below.
      “AR is more proactive than reactive. It is deeply and systematically reflective, and pertains to real concerns, challenges, and goals within your classroom. Typical goals of AR include evaluating outcomes, enhancing student achievement, and improving educational practices.” https://www.edweek.org/tm/articles/2012/09/05/tln_pillars_actionresearch.html

    • Patrick Hester says:

      Action research basically is research you preform yourself to improve your own performance. It can be used to reflect on current operating procedures you are using, or to solve an immediate problem. For example, if you wanted to see if kids do better at math or reading right after recess. One week you could have math right after recess and monitor student’s attention, behavior, and test scores. Then, next week have reading after recess and compare your results. Was one subject easier than the other after recess? Were the test results different? Action research can be used on very small-scale problems or an entire school could preform some type of action research on the student population.

    • Cat Donnelly says:

      Action research spans a variety of analytical, evaluative and investigative research methods designed to delve into problems that have arisen
      in an educational setting, such as a classroom. Such problems could include academic or instructional issues, which can be directly addressed by the educator through his/her use of action research methods to develop quick and practical solutions to target any such problem. It can be performed individually and targeted to an instructor’s specific class, or on a wider scale to involve a school or district.

    • Tara Sloan says:

      Definition from: https://www.edglossary.org/action-research/

      Action research refers to research designed to diagnose problems or weaknesses—whether organizational, academic, or instructional—to help develop practical solutions. Action research may also be used for programs that educators simply want to learn more about and improve. The general goal is to create a simple, practical, repeatable process of iterative learning, evaluation, and improvement that leads to increasingly better results for schools, teachers, or programs.

      Action research may also be called a cycle of action or cycle of inquiry since it typically follows a predefined process that is repeated over time.

      Identify a problem to be studied
      Collect data on the problem
      Organize, analyze, and interpret the data
      Develop a plan to address the problem
      Implement the plan
      Evaluate the results of the actions taken
      Identify a new problem
      Repeat the process

    • Nora Daly says:

      Action research refers to research methods that are designed to diagnose problems as well as develop effective solutions. Action research allows one to identify questions, test out strategies, and gather data to determine whether something works. In education, the teacher actively participates while also conducting the research. Data collection can include both qualitative and quantitative data, from which conclusions can be formed.

    • Scott Compton says:

      I would define action research as a form of field research where the researcher and the test group aren’t divided. It can be used by any educator to refine their practice and collect meaningful data on whether their actions were resulting in their intended consequences. It starts with planning, then moves to action, then analysis, and lastly arrives at a conclusion.

      A way I could see myself using action research is by seeing if giving a quiz results in a higher score if I do it at the beginning of class as apposed to the end. I would start with inquiry, and seeing what literature already existed about assessment and the effect of breaks on kids. Then I would design my experiment. I could receive qualitative data, quantitative, or both. After receiving data I would analyze it. To put this in practice, after researching, I could see alternate having my different periods take tests at different times during their period and see if any meaningful results came from it.

    • Phoenix Bansmer says:

      Action Research is an organized process in which an individual or group poses questions, gathers information, analyzes and deconstructs the findings of the research. A defining feature of this type of research is that it is conducted by the people who will be making use of the results, rather than an outsider conducting research.

      It’s purpose is to discover what can be improved, clarified, or updated about the particular work the researcher is doing. In a school setting this can be a teacher testing out a new teaching method, tracking how it works for students (perhaps by test scores before and after using the method), analyzing the results, and making choices afterward to determine if there was a positive impact, and if the method should continue to be used in the classroom.

    • Taylor Stotts says:

      I googled this question: “what is action research?” I immediately found a published book on ascend.org by Richard Sager, which discusses action research. He provides the definition, “ … is a disciplined process of inquiry conducted by and for those taking the action.” Thus, I think action research essentially is a way in which teachers or educators can observe, analyze, and so on their classrooms and students so ultimately better the learning environment. Another key passage in the book says, “… action research helps educators be more effective at what they care most about- their teaching and development of their students.”

    • Chelsea Hamar says:

      I found a helpful video on youtube that helped me understand action research: https://youtu.be/TOrQ-sVTuE0

      Dr. Carol Davenport helped me understand action research by talking about continuing professional development as a teacher. Action research can be designed and conducted by teachers who want to analyze and observe data from prior problems taking place in their classrooms in order to improve their own practices. Teachers do this because they want to understand why things are taking places in their classrooms and what can be done to continue improving classroom environment. This can have many cycles depending on what works and what doesn’t for that specific teacher.

    • Brooke Berman says:

      Action research is initiated by an individual or group of colleagues to investigate and examine an issue to improve the learning and instruction in a classroom. Action research is found to be very relevant because the focus of each research project is determined by the researchers, who are the primary consumers of the finding. Action research helps educators be more effective about what they care about most.

    • Kyle Hook says:

      When reading the process taken for successful Action Research, I immediately thought of the Scientific Method and that the biggest difference was that Action Research can provide practical and immediate applications. Mostly, because the researchers/experimenters are also the beneficiaries. There are of course other obvious differences, but the structure of both are very similar. Another comparison that helped me understand Action Research was that teachers were becoming inventors. The goal of any invention is to fix a problem, or fill a void in the market and THAT is everything Action Research sets to do; identify the void and invent the best solution to fill it.

    • Michaela Wasson says:

      I looked online and based off what I read I would define action research as educators making informed, data-driven decisions on the improvement of their own class, school or district. This will involve a cycle of action: identifying a problem, collecting and analyzing data, developing a plan, implementing the plan and then evaluating your results before identifying a new problem and starting the cycle again. Since action research is a form of self-evaluation the researchers are also the subjects. As it also uses primarily qualitative research it will focus on a single setting.

    • MacKenzie Cope says:

      My definition of Action Research is inquiry about a specific topic, deciding the question you want to answer, testing the solution, and evaluating the solution for efficiency. I like that it has the teacher as a participant, especially since as a teacher, I should be the most aware of what could/won’t work in my classroom (as a solution). One thing I instantly thought about when researching was the 636 course I am taking this term. We have talked a few times about taking completed tests, evaluating them as a teacher to see where there was general understanding, what areas of the course missed the mark (and lacked student understanding), and evaluating what I could do to ensure better understanding or work to create a deeper knowledge of areas that had higher levels of understanding.
      A common theme I found when researching was this idea of refining your craft, becoming a better teacher and more creative. I LOVE this. As teachers, we should always strive to increase our knowledge, increasing the knowledge of our students.

    • Hailey Brown says:

      After doing some investigating, I would define action research as a process used to solve or reflect on an immediate, specific problem. It is often used in the education system to test the effectiveness of something or look for solutions to problems that are specific to the researcher(s), in order to directly implement changes based on the results. These studies are also most often done collaboratively, rather than by an individual.

    • Emma Castle says:

      Action research is a research method that is used by educators directly working in the school/district being studied. It is used to quickly identify problems or weaknesses and develop practical solutions to solve those issues. The goal is for it to be simple and repeatable in order to create a process that can be used in a repeating cycle to improve classrooms and schools.

  11. MacKenzie Cope says:

    Quantitative research for me! I have already shared that I am a numbers person but even outside of that, I like that its more objective. There are always those entities that look to flip data around to make it LOOK as though it’s saying what they need/want it to, but during analysis of the research, you could always see numbers to back up the charts and graphs. I also like what Jill said though about getting a more in-depth look at the study when you can add in the contact with individuals.. It would be interesting to see how a research project could incorporate aspects of both qualitative AND quantitative.

  12. Todd Twyman says:

    Identify which research tradition you tend to lean towards, and explain why.

    • Tara Sloan says:

      Topic: Overcoming negative academic self-esteem related to reading-acquisition difficulties in K, 1, 2

      Research shows that early reading has a significant impact on future academic success. When children experience challenges early on they can feel embarrassed or stupid. It may be that they have an undiagnosed learning disability or simply have not had access to print or parents that read to them. But regardless, they are behind. How does negative self-esteem affect their ability to overcome that challenge? What tools can we use to build self-esteem and bring them up to speed efficiently and effectively?

      My brother struggled with reading and was held back to do the second grade for a second time because of it. This has nothing to do with his intelligence (he is now an airline captain flying 747s). He overcame it with an incredible amount of work and dedication from my parents and grandparents, but this experience was traumatic for him. Not all kids have the support and advocacy he did to overcome. I wonder what happens to these kids and what potential is lost because of it, and I would love to know how I can help my students in the future.

    • Jill Holden says:

      Hi, everyone! I definitely tend to lean towards qualitative research rather than quantitative. I have never really had a head for numbers, so I have an easier time understanding and connecting with qualitative research. I also like that qualitative research requires more contact with the individuals in question, and provides a more in depth study.

    • MacKenzie Cope says:

      Quantitative research for me! I have already shared that I am a numbers person but even outside of that, I like that its more objective. There are always those entities that look to flip data around to make it LOOK as though it’s saying what they need/want it to, but during analysis of the research, you could always see numbers to back up the charts and graphs. I also like what Jill said though about getting a more in-depth look at the study when you can add in the contact with individuals.. It would be interesting to see how a research project could incorporate aspects of both qualitative AND quantitative.

      • Jill Holden says:

        Hi! I really like what your saying about quantitative research, and why you prefer it over qualitative. I do sometimes have a hard time making sense of it, but it is more objective, can reach a larger number of people, and you can see the specific numbers that are used for charts/graphs. I really need to practice using both. Maybe by starting out with qualitative, and then backing up my finding with quantitative…or something along those lines.

    • Cate Huang says:

      Hi all! This is Cate Huang. I am currently working as an EA at Camas Ridge Elementary School. I have two boys ages 8 and 12. The only question I have at the moment about this course is that even if we question the trainings we’ll be receiving, how will we, as teachers, be able to navigate the politics of school districts and actually receive useful trainings.

      My preferred researches lean toward abstract ones. Even though its length may be limited, it provides all the essential information. For me, it’s important to look at the situation as a whole to truly understand the drive of the research, if the conducting methods can accurately answer the questions or verify the hypothesis, and if the results would truly reflect the situation and answer the driving question.

    • Phoenix Bansmer says:

      I would say qualitative research is very intriguing to me, because I like the sociological aspect to it – why do people do this, or make that choice, and how does it relate to what I’m researching? It feels like a natural fit for my interest in human nature.

      However, I see the value of quantitative research. Numbers don’t have opinions, and sometimes removing the potential bias is the stronger research choice. I am not comfortable with numbers (learning disabilities never go away) but I want to become confident with this research tradition, so I can make informed decisions in my work.

    • John Donaldson says:

      If I had to use only one, I would choose qualitative research over quantitative research. I’m much more a people person than a numbers one. I much prefer dealing with people over crunching numbers, plus I tend to want to dig deeper into subject matters of interest. Finding a person’s opinions, motivations and reasonings appeal to me. That’s one of the reasons why I enjoy history so much. It allows me to examine not only the actions involved but the thought processes behind them.

    • Michelle Nelson says:

      Hi, everyone! I lean toward qualitative research. I’m fascinated with the “insider” perspective and understanding behaviors, attitudes and perspectives. My interests and my personality fit better with a research approach conducted “with” subjects rather than “to” them.

      As a journalist, however, I value the underpinnings of quantitative research, including objectivity. While statistics can be disputed, even manipulated, I think people generally tend to see numbers as lending an air of credibility.

      • John Donaldson says:

        I agree with you that people tend to look at the numbers as the final authority of proof in a reasearch project. I think though that can be misleading in dealing with people, who are all different and respond in some intresting and unique ways. Numbers can show a strong trend while the quality research can show when that trend may no longer apply to the individual, or if the research is being used in a manner it was not designed for, as Todd pointed out in his story about his child being assessed in the reading program.

    • Chemika Bolden says:

      I tend to lean towards Qualitative research. With my background in Ethnic Studies it was more focused on attitudes, perceptions, experiences, etc. I find that I am more interested in the social aspect of people and how they relate to others and how society relates to them. After reading the material about research I noticed that in my undergraduate work that the quantitative research was there but not the main focus only as supportive evidence. For example X% of people shared similar attitudes/circumstances.

    • Leah Cruzen says:

      I tend to lean more toward qualitative research, as it has been helpful to me in my work. I have used surveys at my job to try to problem solve, to see how to support ELD students better.I am comfortable analyzing statistical data, but I find that it can be hard to access fully as many times there are missing details about the group that was tested. For example, at a Professional Development day we compared the data for our students who graduated and many times there were just numbers that didn’t reflect how many students there actually were. For example it said four Hispanic students graduated, but how many Hispanic students did we have total that year, and what does it take to be categorized as Hispanic? I find the qualitative data can give more of the whole picture.

    • Maddy Simons says:

      I prefer quantitative research most definitely. Numbers are straight forward, and something that cannot be misconstrued. five plus five will always equal ten, but an opinion on how well someone executed a paper can be forever up in the air. Reading a chart of numbers is also easier for me than reading an article. I have never been one to love reading, unfortunately. I think with qualitative research being more subjective, it makes it overall a trickier way of research due to the potential biases within a study.

    • Nora Daly says:

      Although I find qualitative research very interesting, I tend toward quantitative research because it’s more objective and less likely to change. Because quantitative research is put in terms of numbers, the results are seen more as actual facts that can’t be swayed by interpretation. In contrast, qualitative research depends a lot on values, attitudes, or perceptions which can change. I like the concreteness of quantitative research and that it can be demonstrated by numbers, graphs, and charts. I am, however, really interested in the “why” of things, which usually relates more towards qualitative research. The social and psychological aspects are incredibly intriguing.

    • Patrick Hester says:

      Simple answer: I prefer qualitative over quantitative. However, I feel both have their advantages depending on the subject being researched. For example, If I’m researching about how the weather affects people’s moods, I’d probably go with qualitative because I feel like the quantitative variables would be too hard to establish reliably. Conversely, If I was researching the average temperatures in the United States over the last 100 years I would prefer quantitative. Someone’s opinion about how hot or cold it is in their area wouldn’t really help if I’m researching the entire United States. I would need massive data samples over a large area. Quantitative would be the best way to get that large overall picture.
      Obviously both are important and reinforce themselves. Overall, I think qualitative research gives context to what you are studying and quantitative can provide the concrete numbers.

    • Cat Donnelly says:

      I tend to lean towards qualitative research because it uses more exploratory techniques to research and gain insight into reasons and motivations. I find this type of research comes more naturally to me than analyzing numbers and measurements because I like exploring the human aspect and delving into that part, and numbers analysis has always been more difficult for me. I would say though that using numbers to back up qualitative research does lend it more credibility, and using these two methods together might be the ideal approach.

    • Tara Sloan says:

      I prefer qualitative research.

      In the comparison of the two, the reading stated that quantitative research focuses on the what of a phenomenon, and qualitative may help explain why. I think the why will be more actionable in our work as educators.

      It also starts with no preconceived hypothesis that it is trying to prove, so in that way, the findings seem purer to me. There seems more room for the gray areas to shine if they exist because the process is designed in a way that allows it. I also like the spirit behind it best because they seem derived out of curiosity to discover rather than prove a thought.

      However, I totally agree with Michelle and Patrick, there is a time where quantitative is more appropriate, and in some cases is viewed as more valid because its results are not left to narrative interpretations.

      I need to add that I was not sure how I would feel about sharing in this format, but really appreciate hearing all of your voices. Way more interesting and helpful than I thought it would be. I feel tempted to engage with you all, but don’t want to go down that wormhole because there is a lot of work to be done for next week 🙂

      • Michaela Wasson says:

        I like your thought about the space qualitative research allows for the development of the hypothesis. It makes the procedure a whole lot messier but its true it will probably be more useful in our role as educators. Maybe the two can work together. I suppose once we answer the what question about the problem we’re facing we can use qualitative research to explain why and then come up with a solution.

    • Scott Compton says:

      Hi friends! I’m usually most interested in qualitative data as it tries to answer the questions that make me the most curious. There’s a metaphor regarding wilderness, where some people see forests where others see individual trees, and I’m much more the type of person who sees the entire forest. What I mean by this, is I don’t care so much for the finer details beyond how they answer the big picture questions. I do think there’s a place for quantitative research in my eyes though. One of my biggest academic regrets is not familiarizing myself with economics more, because I think that field can really make some generalizing statements given the right quantitative data. Basically, I find that some quantitative data can truly be used to answer the big question.

      So, to answer the question succinctly, I don’t really care whether we use qualitative data or quantitative, I just care that the questions we are answering are meaningful, and I find that’s usually done more wholly through qualitative data but can be done remarkably well and with assuredness through quantitative data.

    • Kyle Hook says:

      I would have a hard time completing any project without using both qualitative AND quantitative. My mind tends to work in that macro level, needing to understand the full picture before answering a narrowed question (or at least I WANT to understand the full picture). I believe I have strengths in both as I am not afraid of numbers and control found in quantitative; I actually would seek them out to further prove the results of the qualitative results. There are certain studies that would have to be restricted or at least acknowledged of the fault because responses may say one thing but lack revelation of motivation behind the answer. That “why” could/would/should heavily dictate the proper reaction and any applied process that comes from the study.

      • Kyle Hook says:

        Hello all,
        My name is Kyle Hook and I am a teacher convert. I never took the time to consider the profession until recently and am very excited that I did. I am currently an EA at Springfield High and each time I am able to make a connection with a child, share knowledge, and them understand that knowledge, I know I have had a good day. I believe this course will help sharpen my research and critical thinking facilities to better my evolution as a teacher. To that point, I look forward to the future!

    • Taylor Stotts says:

      It’s hard to choose one, as they both have a purpose depending on what you are researching. However, I definitely feel like qualitative is more interesting. Through this type of research you can see others perceptions, and it’s more personal. Whereas quantitative research is more number based, and while that information is necessary at times, there are also cases where numbers can’t provide you with all the information. Part of my lean towards qualitative research is probably because I’m not a number gal, but I have had to conduct research using both methods and they both are beneficial.

    • Chelsea Hamar says:

      Whoops! Here is a copy of my comment posted above.

      I believe that both qualitative and quantitative research have their own benefits but if I had to choose one, I tend to prefer qualitative research. I was an English major, so numbers are not always my friend. I enjoy qualitative research because it has to do more with the “how” and “why” of things. I find that the information found from qualitative research is much more interesting and rewarding compared to the findings of quantitative research.

    • Brooke Berman says:

      Although I find qualitative research more interesting, I tend to lean more towards quantitative research because I think it can be more accurate. I like that qualitative research gives you the opportunity to dive deeper into the topic and learn about different perspectives, ways of thinking, and opinions. However, I think when gathering data, quantitative research is more spot on since it is structured, statistical, and is designed to collect facts.

    • Michaela Wasson says:

      I lean towards quantitative research methods because they can be used to test generalized understandings of the way the world works. Quantitative research seems to have limitations when dealing with the complexities of a human response but I like the simplicity of its focus. I tend to create hypothesis quickly and I like being able to organize specific procedures to answer a question. I appreciate being able to test my assumptions about the events and people around me and come up with an objective, measurable result. It’s very satisfying.

    • Hailey Brown says:

      I would prefer to use both methods (quantitative and qualitative) since they look at things a little differently and allow you to get a more complete picture of what is going on and to answer more complex questions. But if I had to choose only one, I would go with quantitative research since it is more objective and can still be used to answer complex questions with some creativity and statistical manipulation. I personally feel like qualitative research can be more complicated to effectively gather objective data and interpret that data.

Leave a Reply