Analytic Memo-

Cori Oyler

Synthesis Statement:

  1. Through my observations and various forms of data collected, one synthesis statement from the research is that the teacher I observed is constantly giving  feedback, she gives feedback in all areas of her instruction.  The feedback is always positive.

Key Support Data:

Student/Teacher Observations:

Date: Observation: Quote:
5/3/2016 N- was making a poor choice by sneaking peeks at the already created spelling words while taking a spelling test. “I love how A

is making the correct choice and listening to the word in a sentence, A- please clip up.”

5/4/2016 C-did a skeleton book report and made a main character as Stuart Little. L was messing around and not wanting to make his character. “Thank you for listening to the directions and making use of your time, C.”  Class, if you are not staying on task, please take note of what C is doing.”
5/5/2016 Correcting spelling tests This is not a quote, but she wrote on every single paper.  Some of it was a “be careful” and others were a smiley face, or a keep up a good work.  It didn’t matter if they received 2/16 or 16/16, they had some type of comment on their paper.
5/5/16 During music the whole class achieved their goal of a score of 10.  They celebrated with receiving 5 marbles.
This type of feedback happens everyday all day.  There isn’t a time that it doesn’t happen when she is in charge of the class.  She has no control over the other areas that the students enter into.  She scaffolds their learning with this praise/feedback.  The expectations are clear and precise.

 

Teacher Survey

This was the survey that was submitted to the teacher:  Please take a few minutes to answer the following questions.

  1. How do you communicate instructional feedback to your students? (Face to face, written on assignments, whole class…etc.)
  • Face to face – verbal check ins
  • Graded work – scores and comments written on assessments and assignments
  • Whole class – beginning, middle, and end of lessons
  • Small group – during reading groups, interventions

Her reply was:  She does all of these.  She doesn’t do much on graded work because there isn’t much to grade except unit ending tests.  She communicates/gives feedback in a positive way all day.  She learned this is the best way for the students to feel successful and to build trust with them and further their relationships with her and to build confidence within themselves.

  1. How do you think your students react to the feedback you give them? Do they use it?

Generally feedback is encouraging and constructive and handled well. There are times feedback is not received well. For example, when giving feedback on behavioral changes that need to take place. When this is the case options, time, and breaks are provided so that student can calm down and make a good choice.

  1. What hinders your ability to give instructional feedback to your students?
  • Lack of time
  • Large class size
  • Many high behavioral needs
  • Many students with high needs
  1. On a scale of 1-10, (1 being not too often and 10 being 10 or more times during the school day)  how often do you give instructional feedback to your students?

1         2        3        4        5        6        7        8        9        10

Again, this teacher gives feedback/communication ALL OF THE TIME.  Her positive spin helps the student think critically and dig deeper.  She is constantly giving feedback even to change a behavior.  She is putting the responsibility back onto the student.

Relevant Literature:

Choice Words, How our Language Affects Children’s Learning. (Johnston, Peter H, 2004, Stenhouse Publishers, www.stenhouse.com)

The Courage To Teach, Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life, (Palmer, Parker J., 1998, 2007, Jossey-Bass, 989 Market Street, San Fransico, CA 94103-1741)

My mentor teacher gives feedback 99% of her day.  It is almost always positive and supportive of the child’s learning.  She is aware that the feedback she gives helps build the confidence in the student as well as deepens the child’s learning.  She is “double-dipping” as far as scaffolding the child’s learning and causing the child to think critically about their learning.

Questions I still have:

Why aren’t other educators using this type of strategy in their student’s?

  1.  Synthesis Statement: How does the feedback received from the students impact their learning?  What type of feedback is most prominent in the classroom?  When the teacher verbalizes the feedback to an individual student she impacts a greater audience.

Key Support Data:

To help triangulate our data, we surveyed the students in the rooms we were in.  We each did a random order of 7 students.  Here is the data from in which I did:

Out of 7 randomly selected students.  3 boys and 4 girls here are the results.

  1. How do you feel when your teacher talks to you about your work? 4 proud, 1 motivated, 1 nervous, 1 unknown.
  2. Do you trust your peers to give you feedback?  Please explain why:
  1. Sometimes because they do not always tell me the truth
  2. Sometimes because they might lie because they are mad
  3. Sometimes because they don’t listen to me
  4. Yes, they will be honest
  5. I feel very good because it is nice
  6. Yes, I trust them
  7. Most of the time
  8.  Do you trust your teacher to give you feedback?  Please explain your answer.
  • Yes, because I trust her
  • Sometimes it is good, sometimes it is bad
  • Yes, she will be honest
  • She does it all of the time, but she doesn’t call on my hand when it is up
  • Yes, she is the teacher
  • Yes, because the teacher always tells me the truth
  • Yes, even when I mess up, she still likes me
  1.  From a scale from 1-5 how fulfilled do you feel with the type of feedback you receive?
  • 3
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 5
  • 4

I scaffolded the learning here to make sure they knew what fulfilled meant.

Analysis:     I observed the students as well.  They respond in a positive manner to all feedback.  Even when it seems to be behavioral.  When Ms. Van Horn gives feedback to a student verbally, it helps reign the rest of the class in.  They are given a task to complete, and if someone is off task the feedback will be given as follows “ I love how Suzy is staying on task and focused.” This is usually the seat partner of the student that is off task.  While teaching on the smart board, she will invite students up to complete the problem and if it is not quite correct, she will ask if the student wants to call on another of their peers to help them complete the task.  This is critical thinking and helps deepen the understanding of all of the students.

Relevant Literature:Both books mentioned above were helpful in this study.  The other book, Teaching with Love & Logic, Taking Control of the Classroom were helpful. (Fay, J and Funk, D. 1995, The Love and Logic Press, Inc., 2207 Jackson St., Golden, CO 80401).  This book showed that trustworthiness is important to learning and the language that is used is a key piece to that.  The survey above shows that as well.  “Learning from consequences is a struggle that can cause pain, but surviving the struggle is a great self-concept builder.  We learn we are capable.” (p. 131).

Analysis:

From the observations and survey students seem to trust their teacher and most of their peers.  They seem to rely on this feedback and language that the teacher uses.  In my observation and the back knowledge I have about some of the students, this is the only positive communication that some of the students have and they seem to have a thirst for it.

I observed the students as well.  They respond in a positive manner to all feedback.  Even when it seems to be behavioral.  When Ms. Van Horn gives feedback to a student verbally, it helps reign the rest of the class in.  They are given a task to complete, and if someone is off task the feedback will be given as follows “ I love how Suzy is staying on task and focused.” This is usually the seat partner of the student that is off task.  While teaching on the smart board, she will invite students up to complete the problem and if it is not quite correct, she will ask if the student wants to call on another of their peers to help them complete the task.  This is critical thinking and helps deepen the understanding of all of the students.

Questions I still have:

What would the trust ratio be in a class that students aren’t given constant feedback?  How would their behavior, learning, and overall attitude be?  Would it make a difference to throw in some positive language, communication, and feedback? If they are given the above positive language, feedback, would they learn and dig deeper into critical thinking?

  1.   Synthesis Statement:  What would be the benefit from not giving feedback of any type?

As an educator, my goal is for the student to leave the classroom a better person.  This means academically, and socially.  If I can give them the best possible tools to have in their tool kit, why wouldn’t I do that?  This means having the tool box lined with language and feedback.  I want their confidence to bloom.   Causing them to pause and dig deeper, to think critically by giving them a question to their answer is the way that is proposed in Choice Words, How our Language Affects Children’s Learning. (Choice Words, How our Language Affects Children’s Learning(Johnston, P H, 2004 Stenhouse Publishers, Portland, Maine)

“The language we choose in our interactions with children influences the ways they frame these events, and they ways the events influence their developing sense of agency.” (p. 34).

Relevant Literature:

(Choice Words, How our Language Affects Children’s Learning(Johnston, P H, 2004 Stenhouse Publishers, Portland, Maine)

This book shows that the language/feedback we give our students is helpful for developing critical thinking. It is helpful in developing relationships and confidence in our students as well as helping the teacher scaffold for learning and bringing out the best in the students.  This is the case even when trying to redirect a behavior.

Analysis:

The observation and survey answers suggest that the students trust their teacher to give them feedback, but they also rely on their peers as well.  It suggests that they trust their teacher to give them instructional/academic feedback, and their peers to be social feedback.  Of course, the audience I was surveying was 2nd grade.  They still are trying to build their confidence in academics and socially.  Using “choice words” and helping them build their ability to think critically by using language that will do that is key communication.  The earlier we can instill that in them, then the earlier they will get a start on success.  I don’t show any data other than that of frustration that would benefit NOT giving positive data to the students.

Questions I still have:

I still don’t understand why an educator (or anyone for that matter) wouldn’t want to better their students by helping them succeed by using positive language and feedback.

 

 

 

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