9/11-9/17

Tasks for this Module:

1. Download the appropriate EdTPA documents. Due by 9/17.

  • Here is the site for EdTPA Resources: http://wordpress.ed.pacificu.edu/edtpa/
    • Be sure to watch the videos, read the “Making Good Choices” guide, and download your handbook as soon as you can.
    • The password is pacificedtpa

2. Post your topics of interest on the “Topics” page. Due by 9/17. Then start reading on your topic. 🙂

3. Read this article and come prepared to critique it in class: computer-adapted-cbi_jsetv21n2. You may find these guidelines helpful when you read the article: 3 Critiquing Research. Due by 9/17.

4. Complete Module 1: EDUC_612_Fall_2017_Module_1 and the pdf just in case: EDUC_612_Fall_2017_Module_1. Check applicable due dates in Module 1.

I have started all appropriate threads. Please click the reply button underneath the original thread and so on as you respond to others. Let’s see how this goes…

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any difficulties with this module at all.

Todd

167 Responses to 9/11-9/17

  1. gang4513 says:

    Action research is a process of problem solving. Research is done by the participants, it is a team approach to evaluate and improve current practices. The problem can be studied, data collected, analyze data, develop a plan and activate the plan.

    The research tradition I tend to lean toward is Descriptive Research because I have been involved with different organizations/committees in which we have executed a survey to research different things. I have also completed surveys, I enjoy giving feedback and expressing my opinion. Surveys make people feel like they have a say in potential change, like their opinions matter.

  2. vand7393 says:

    Teacher Action Research is a method for education practitioners to engage there assessment within there own practice. I believe that TAR is important for young teachers because they can practice there own ideas and take what works and get rid of what didn’t. I also believe that it is important for older teachers to maybe try something new and it would be beneficial for them to learn.

  3. TJ says:

    I can’t find the “topics” page but my topics of interest revolve around obesity, nutrition, and how it applies to injuries. These are general but I’m sure as I read more articles I will be able to focus in on something more direct. I know that there are some others here (Kyle, Maddie, and Jasmine) with similar interests so excited to share ideas.

  4. kipl9798 says:

    After searching around on edchange.org for a little while, I would define Teacher Action Research as research that educators do both individually and collectively, as a reflective process, to better themselves and their teaching communities through formative practices.

  5. Jake says:

    Teacher Action Research is basically learning by doing. A problem is identified, discussed and then is attempted to be solved. If the first attempt does not work, then you try again. Afterwards, there a reflective phase. What sets Teacher Action Research apart is that it has an emphasis on scientific study. That is to say, the attempt to solve the problem should be backed up by some sort of tested evidence or educational theory. T.A.R. is also subjective for the ones solving the problem– they have a bias and acknowledge that bias. T.A.R. is a hands-on way for teachers to solve real life problems. One question I have is: How can T.A.R. be applied to schools with problems that have a pressing deadline? I would imagine it would be difficult for teachers to obtain much, if any, scientific research from students or teachers if the said problem arose, say a few days before the end of school.

  6. ophe4482 says:

    Teacher Action Research (TAR) is about teachers becoming reflective practitioners of their classroom allowing them to be adaptable and having the opportunity to make changes in a classroom to improve the learning of all students. They feel empowered to create new procedures or methodology for their students that cultivate a higher level of concept and understanding, but only through thoughtful research.

  7. gang4513 says:

    Hi my name is Wendy and I am returning to school after a very long break. My bachelors degree is in business and I worked in the insurance industry until I decided to stay home and raise my children. I am from the Portland area and have lived in Eugene for 17 years. I started as a volunteer at the elementary school my children attended, then that turned into a job as an EA in the Title 1 program. I love my job, I enjoy interacting with the students and teaching reading and math to struggling learners. I am feeling overwhelmed, trying to figure out how to balance work, family and school but I have had friends go through this program so I know it can be done.

  8. puck5811 says:

    T.A.R. is a combination of efforts brought forth by all personally contributing parties in education. It begins with the classroom, in the classroom. The teacher can at no time be sure about a)the applicable content of his lesson plan b)the success of various exercises therein. Every lesson is a conflagration of experimentation directed by the teacher, aiming for certain results but ready to adapt. This idea stretches outwards like student tentacles into the community where problems can also be observed and rectified by social action. In general, a T.A.R. school community atmosphere is one in which the educational approach is constantly evolving to address an ever-changing reality, an atmosphere that is more can-do than is.

  9. lynn3392 says:

    Hello,
    My name is Holly and I am currently the answer to life, the universe, and everything. (If you are a Douglas Addams fan you will get that last part.) I am obtaining my master in teaching to teach STEM in either middle or high school. I am currently a Research Associate/ Lab Manager of a research lab at UO. I am also a wife, mother, sister and daughter and main social director for my family. My myers-brigs is ENTJ and I can be a bit of a smart donkey. I currently have no burning questions on this class. I will however try my best to post helpful links and info the glossary as we start to dig into the wonderful world of stats and research terms. Thank you for your time.
    Cheers,
    Holly

    • emer3389 says:

      Hello Holly,
      I remember having you has our Lab Manager during my year of bio 211-213 of the U of O, You appear very willing to help and I will definitely be looking to you for some help during this class. It is quite impressive that you are a mother/wife and full time worker and I think we will all benefit from you being in our class.

      -Joe.

    • puck5811 says:

      Hi Holly,
      I’m the answer to life, the universe, and everything minus five. Glad to see a fellow Douglas Adams fan on here. Have you ever read his detective novels?

  10. monn4522 says:

    Hi everyone,
    I’m Jessica. I’ve known I wanted to be a teacher for a long time now, but I was so unsure of exactly what I wanted to teach it took me a long time to get around to starting a teaching program. I’m glad to be here with you all! I’ve worked with kids in a few different contexts. I was a T.A. for two years in college for a couple different art history courses. I’ve also volunteered in schools, most recently with the SMART program at Cesar Chavez Elementary. I’ve enjoyed every grade level I worked with, but have decided I want to teach middle or high school because I find the content more interesting. I’m sure I will have many questions, but right now I am trying to take everything day by day. Mostly I am concerned with balancing school and work. I’m looking forward to getting to know everyone this term.

    • puck5811 says:

      I used to ride my bike by there in the afternoons on the way home from work and always enjoyed seeing the kids taking part in gardening. Do you know much about that program?

      • monn4522 says:

        I don’t know very much about that program but I think teaching kids about gardening is a great idea at any grade level. I’m just learning myself and wish I had started earlier.

  11. page3603 says:

    Todd, there isn’t a way to post on the topics thread yet, unless I’m just missing something which is totally possible. – Kyla

  12. pede3730 says:

    Todd, for the assigned article, are we to read all of the studies in the link or just the first one about computer-adapted, etc.?

  13. Todd Twyman says:

    Introduce yourself on this thread. You all know me. What about you?

    • norr4573 says:

      Hello, I’m Chelsea. Ive been working with kids for over 10 years now and I always knew teaching was what I wanted to do. I have a passion for the little ones, kinder and first. For the past two years I worked as a ea in a k-1 classroom and am now working as a title ea.
      My burning question is, ahhhh! How am I gunna get it all done?

      • fouq2882 says:

        Hi Chelsea! Nice to meet you. I wish you the best of luck in this class. I have no doubt you can do it. You’ll get it all done one day at a time ;)!

      • kell2488 says:

        I have the same fear but I know if I take it one day at a time it will all get done eventually. Keep chipping away at it and don’t save everything for the last minute, something will pop up.

      • ward4486 says:

        Hi Chelsea! I think we are all feeling the same way but if we make each class, reading and assignment a priority and take them one step at a time, like our peers above have stated, we’ll be able to successfully complete the course while enjoying it! Time management is going to be our best friend. Goodluck!!

      • lynn3392 says:

        I’m going to rely on scheduling and caffeine. 🙂

      • ophe4482 says:

        Chelsea, I am with you 100%! But that is why we have an awesome cohort. I realized we are all feeling the same way and we should lean on each other. It is going to be a crazy 17 months–but then again only 17 months. YOU CAN DO IT!!!!! Char (from the bar)

    • puck5811 says:

      Brothers and Sisters,
      My name is Don and I am in this program primarily due to the quandary in which I found myself upon returning to the US after teaching English at all age and skill levels in the former-USSR for a decade. Acclaim and success overseas having not translated to many ameliorative work opportunities, I seek to attain popular documentation for a career in teaching the linguistic arts of Russian and English, whilst looking for a third endorsement as an ESOL teacher.
      I am a true believer in the power of pencils and paper practice, but only when combined with the innovative approach of modern schools of pedagogy employing communicative approaches to teach language. The questions I hope to answer are legion, but namely involve second-language acquisition as multi-competence, applied linguistics, and educational psychology.

      • ophe4482 says:

        Hi Don, Russian? I studied International Studies with an emphasis on Eastern Europe and took a couple semesters of Russian back in the late 80’s/early 90’s. It was an exciting time to study it. I can remember very little except, ‘Ya ne Znaio! ( I am spelling it wrong), but it is translated “I don’t know!” It helped me survive Russian because I said it a lot. Good luck on your studies.

      • Jake says:

        Hi Don, I am excited to be studying alongside you. With someone with as much experience as you, I find it rather annoying that you need, as you put it, “popular documentation” in order to be able to teacher here in the United States at a reasonable salary. I do agree with you about the power of pencils and paper- knowledge is power and today’s students our future.

        -Jake

    • pede3730 says:

      Hey everyone, my name is Kyle. I had a brief period of opportunity in my undergraduate coursework to work with children in a classroom setting and thoroughly enjoyed it. At that time, I was still on the path to be a physical therapist, so I didn’t really give teaching a thought. Four years and a lot of life decisions later, here I am. Research and I have never really been friends, so my question is how can I improve my research techniques/critiques and actually start to enjoy it? I think I will be finding that out shortly.

      • silv3268 says:

        Hey Kyle,
        I’m not really sure how you can improve your research methods as I am a novice myself but I think it has to do with knowing how to find and read articles effectively/efficiently and staying organized. At least that is my guess. I think we will be learning a lot in this class on the topic. I will happily share any tips I pick up along the way. Feel free to do the same with me!
        Katie

        • kipl9798 says:

          Feel free to do the same with me as I have very similar feelings towards research. I am excited to acquire new research skills that will hopefully make the whole research process less daunting. At least we are in it together!
          Maddie

    • fouq3376 says:

      Hi! I’m Lea. I’m originally from Michigan but I can’t get enough of the Pacific Northwest. My education background includes teaching in Spain for one year, Korea for two, teaching English at a college, and being a Special Education EA for two years. I am excited to research topics I care about but also overwhelmed by the work that it will take!

      • fouq3376 says:

        My most burning questions is: Will the answers I discover in research be the answers I want?

        • Todd Twyman says:

          Good question. Most of the time research bears out our instincts, but good research can also move us in a different direction and out of our comfort zone. That’s why we do it. 🙂

        • Phoenix says:

          Hi Lea! That’s a question I’m wondering about as well. I am bringing my own personal experience with gender bias as a twice exceptional student to my research, and I actually want to be wrong. I would rather that students are not treated differently based on gender, or at least maybe that it has improved since I was a student. But my instinct tell me it’s probably going to be emotional research as I view this question from the outside in.

      • thom3640 says:

        Lea,

        Where did you teach in Spain? I taught in Santiago de Compostela for two years. Did you do the Auxiliares de Conversación program or work in an academia? I was in an academia called El Centro Britanico. 🙂

      • jesse says:

        Lea, what part of Michigan are you from?

        I lived in Ypsilanti for just under two years while my wife was in grad school. I wish we’d had more time to explore the state, but we liked the little bit of it we did experience. Camping in the UP was wild.

    • pitt2892 says:

      Hi, I am Brianne. I started working/teaching the preteen/teen girls at church a few years ago and love it! Before I began working with those girls I never even considered being a teacher. My parents are teachers and had been encouraging me to go back for my teaching degree and I resisted vehemently! But once I allowed myself to focus on what I really wanted to do, I realized what they had seen all along, I wanted to teach. I guess it was in my genes or maybe destiny. Ha. I have four kids and pretty much cry in my closet every day when I think too hard about all the requirements for this program, but than I remember that this is a goal worth striving for and that nothing worth having is necessarily easy to obtain. I am also a notorious oversharer. Obvs. My burning question is more of a general wondering as to whether or not my research will lead me in the direction I think I am headed or will I spin off on a different trajectory altogether?

      • fouq3376 says:

        I think that some of the best teachers are those who resist the calling but end up in it after all, because then they truly know that is what they are supposed to be doing!

      • Jake says:

        Hi Brianne 🙂 Isn’t it annoying when are parents are right about what we should do? The same thing happened for me, haha. With 4 kids, I know you have a lot on your plate, but you got this and we’re all here to help each other out when we need it!

        -Jake

      • kipl9798 says:

        Brianne, from the depth of compassion I have heard you speak of your kiddos in class, I think you would make an excellent teacher just from the standpoint on the amount you care about their success alone. But I too can relate to not really anticipating following in your parents footsteps as a teacher and then coming to that same realization later on. My mom is also a teacher and I originally thought I wanted to do interior design for quite sometime before realizing that I was more suited for teaching.
        Maddie

    • ward4486 says:

      Hello, I’m Jasmine! I have always known that I wanted to work with children and as an undergraduate student at the University of Oregon had the opportunity to volunteer in many classrooms ranging from first to fifth grade. I loved the connections I made with not only the students but the teachers in the classroom and knew that teaching was a career I would enjoy pursuing. I’m looking forward to getting into the classroom again and seeing how the materials from this class will apply. Will the research practices I learn in this class evoke a different process of thinking when in the same environment? Time will tell!

      • fouq2882 says:

        Hi Jasmine! That’s a great question. I am hopeful that this class will evoke different ways of thinking when we are all teachers in a couple of ways. First, I hope we ask questions regarding the material we are teaching instead of just teaching it because we are told to. Second, I hope it encourages us to try new things in our classrooms while giving us the tools to assess outcomes and justify decisions.

    • page3603 says:

      Hi everyone! My name is Kyla and I only decided to be a teacher about a year ago. I started working as a Title I educational assistant at Page Elementary a year ago, as well as a BEST educational assistant at Kelly Middle School and discovered that, despite my resistance (both my teachers were parents), I too love working with kids. I am pursuing a multiple subjects endorsement as well as a middle grades social sciences and possibly language arts endorsements. I am excited for this course because, while I have taken a class on research methods, this course is geared towards academic subjects of which I know little. I’m ready to start doing some reading on the topic of education to inform myself more on the different methodologies people use in order to form my own. At this point my most burning question, which may have been answered in class but there was a lot of information, is will we be sharing our research with our classmates at any point this term or will that take place in the following course?

      • pede3730 says:

        It is my general understanding that we will be learning what makes a research article a good one. So I think we will just be collecting research articles this term as we learn about them and deciding which ones are most relevant that we want to use. I think you would only share your research with classmates if you have a similar topic of interest. As far as sharing your research findings, I think that is reserved for your edTPA next fall. I may be wrong, but that is how I interpreted it. Hope that helps!

        • pitt2892 says:

          I had the same understanding. I was under the impression that we would be collecting material and creating a foundation for our own thesis and figuring out what was relevant and sound.

      • ophe4482 says:

        Hi Kyla, So glad we are taking this course at the same time. I think sharing research is a good idea. If we each concentrate on a particular subject and share our research in a condensed version, we will learn a lot more in many different ares/subjects.

    • ophe4482 says:

      Hi I am Charlene or Char. I have been a preschool director/teacher/owner for 14 years and love it. I began my career as an educator (aka parent) after my second child was born and realized she was not hitting the traditional milestones in development. I plunged myself in research/readings to try to understand my daughter. She was placed in special education to my relief. It was there that I realized I was looking at it the wrong way. I was trying to figure out what was wrong with HER! But in reality, I needed to look at myself and other educators to realize that there was absolutely nothing wrong with her, but my expectations of how and when a child develops was wrong. And here I am, decades after getting my bachelors, studying for a masters along with an ESOL endorsement. WOOHOO!

      • ophe4482 says:

        And my most burning question about the course at this time is…how will I narrow my ideas for a topic?

        • fouq3376 says:

          You can talk to your cohort-we can help! 🙂

        • pede3730 says:

          What excites you and what are you passionate about? If you had to choose one topic to spend the rest of your life learning about, what would it be? Start there, and you should get some pretty good ideas about what you want to select as a topic!

        • thom3640 says:

          Hi Charlene,

          I have the same question. My general topic is ESOL but I am having a hard time narrowing it down to something more specific!

        • kell2488 says:

          Special Education is so important, my mom works with behavior disorder kids at my high school back home and I have multiple cousins who fit the SPED realm, so I to have an interest in the area. It is tough to narrow down but after reading a few articles I’m sure something will stand out and give you a direction to work towards. Good luck!

        • ward4486 says:

          Hey Char! I believe that as we begin to do research on a topic that interests us personally, the more general ideas will begin to narrow down with each new article we read into a more specific topic! Just beginning our research will open up many doors and from there we have endless options! Goodluck finding your topic. 🙂

    • Jake says:

      Hi everyone,

      My name is Jake and I myself am a kid at heart- my spirt age (as I like to call it) is about 10 years old, haha! Seriously though, I have always loved working with kids of any age which is part of the reason why I chose the Pacific Program, because of the K-12 certification. I’m still not certain what age group I want to work with, but I am passionate about using my knowledge of Spanish while teaching and also promoting service learning projects for students in conjunction with their learning, particularly outdoor education ones. It has been 5 years since I have been in school and getting used to homework again is proving difficult, but I am ready for the challenge. Let’s do this!

      • Jake says:

        Hi everyone,

        My name is Jake and I myself am a kid at heart- my spirt age (as I like to call it) is about 10 years old, haha! Seriously though, I have always loved working with kids of any age which is part of the reason why I chose the Pacific Program, because of the K-12 certification. I’m still not certain what age group I want to work with, but I am passionate about using my knowledge of Spanish while teaching and also promoting service learning projects for students in conjunction with their learning, particularly outdoor education ones. It has been 5 years since I have been in school and getting used to homework again is proving difficult, but I am ready for the challenge. Let’s do this!

        Like Kyle, me and research have never been great friends, so my question is how do I make my research more exciting for me as well as how do I improve my research skills (they’ve never been extremely sharp).

        • fouq3376 says:

          I’m curious to see your research topic-maybe ‘teaching foreign language through outdoor education?’ I think that research automatically becomes more exciting when it’s a subject you’re passionate about.

        • page3603 says:

          I think that once you start researching your topic and forming your own opinions about it the research will become more exciting to you. You will be able to evaluate other’s work in reference to your own ideas so it will be much more relevant, and therefore, exciting. In terms of improving your research skills, we will be learning them in class I’m sure, but also your cohort can help you! Also, by researching one specific topic you will find that certain search words and methods work better than others, they just take a little time to develop. Like Todd said in class, google scholar is a great resource for researching peer-reviewed articles.

          • pitt2892 says:

            I am coming back to school after 11 years away! It is scary and a little daunting to immerse myself into intense homework and time management again. Also I am not sure I took it seriously enough in undergrad anyway so I may be doing things “right” for the first time!

      • krop5065 says:

        Hi Jake,

        I think it’s great that you want to bring service projects and Spanish into your curriculum! My experience with teenagers has been that they become much more engaged when they have a platform for student voice. I also would love to work with an outdoor education program at some point. If you learn about any strategies for success for these goals, I hope you share them.
        Good luck and nice to meet you!

    • fouq2882 says:

      Hello, I’m Bryan, and I’m in the evening class. I currently work as a Title EA for Fairfield Elementary. Teaching wasn’t always the thing I wanted to do. Instead, the desire to teach has evolved within me over the last several years. A few years after my undergrad, I decided I wanted to travel. One of the easiest ways to do so was to teach English overseas. I knew I wanted to work in education after teaching in South Korea for three years, but I was still unsure in what capacity. After a couple of years working in higher education, I came to realize that the most enjoyable thing I’d done and what I wanted to do most was teach. Specfically, I want to teach elementary school.
      My purpose for taking this course is that I would like to begin a process in which I identify, research, implement, and measure a specific action or idea that can hopefully improve my students’ outcomes.
      My burning question is what can be accomplished related to this research within the context of student teaching?

      • page3603 says:

        I lived in S. Korea as well! Only for two years though and I was a high school student at an international school.
        That’s a great question and one that I think all of us are wondering and a little nervous about (I am at least). We will be student teaching for a full term though and will have done our observations and practicum’s prior to student teaching so I feel like that time will give us some insight as to which research methods would work best in the classroom. The methods will also depend on your student teaching assignment because different variables will come into play (such as class size, classroom diversity, etc.)

    • thom3640 says:

      Hey Everyone,

      I’m Aryn. I first decided I wanted to become a teacher after volunteer teaching ESL in India in 2007. After finishing my undergrad, I moved to Vietnam and taught there for 3 years and then spent the last 2 years teaching in Spain. Now, I teach ESL online part-time but I’ll probably scale my hours back a lot as we get further into the term. My question is pretty similar to Kyle’s. How can I improve my research skills to be more efficient?

      • puck5811 says:

        How did you get a job teaching as a volunteer in India? Were you there for long?

      • fouq2882 says:

        Hi Aryn. That’s a great question. I am hopeful that we will get some great tips next week in class when we do the Library exercise. I think a lot of it will come down to how quickly we can look at an abstract, and determine if a paper will have what we are looking for based upon the abstract.

      • krop5065 says:

        Hey there,

        IThe best method I’ve found that makes my research more efficient has been to narrow down the topic and find the key words that will guide the search. For me, this happens offline through discussion with others about my general understanding of the topic. Once I’m able to verbally explain a topic to others, I’ve noticed that it is easier for me to pick up on the ideas that I don’t have enough knowledge on, or am curious about diving deeper into.

        On another note, so cool that you have had so much teaching experience abroad!

        – Rebecca

    • mick4682 says:

      Hello Everbody, my name is Gabe and I’m currently a Life Skills EA at a 4j elementary school. I moved to Eugene from Portland, where I was born and raised, in 2015 and have been an EA since then. I like traveling, soccer, cooking among other things. I’m trying to go into Elementary Education and am looking forward to better knowing you’ll.

      • silv3268 says:

        Hey Gabe,
        I’ve never heard of a Life Skills EA but that sounds like a fun job. I’d be interested in knowing what that means in the elementary setting. Also, what sort of things do you like to cook? I enjoy cooking as well. Right now I am very much enjoying the local Oregon produce that is readily available at markets and stores (I just moved to Eugene in July). There’s so much good food around here!
        Cheers,
        Katie

        • mick4682 says:

          Life Skills is very different than a normal classroom. K-5 are all in the same room and we focus on activities that meet their IEP goals. It’s a blast and can be very challenging but we get to do a lot of fun stuff that regular ed doesn’t!

          Lately, I have been doing a lot of baking since I got back from a trip to France. I’ve trying to make a decent macaroon but they aren’t quite there yet.

    • jesse says:

      Hello friends.

      My name is Jesse. I would like to say I discovered that I want to teach after having spent two years teaching in Ukraine, but I spent a long time raging against that idea. Most of the people in my family are teachers. My grandfather was a teacher and then a principle. It’s almost like trying hard not to join the family business.
      Ultimately, though, I just really enjoy working with kids, and I’m passionate about education.

      Like a lot of people, I’m sure, my biggest question is how am I going to manage to actually pull this off? But aside from that, I’m interested in learning how to make research (and the application of that information) a regular part of my life.

      • mccl5095 says:

        “trying hard not to join the family business” – exactly! I was in the same boat for a while, having a family with many teachers. Its interesting that seems to be a theme for at least a few of us in this program. I’m hoping it will be beneficial to have this sort of “inherited” knowledge, and build upon what our parents and grandparents have done.

      • emer3389 says:

        I pushed away the idea of teaching initially for similar reasons but here we all are. The time it took me to finally commit and apply here just makes it feel more right. It appears you all feel the same.

        I have not quite figured out how I am going to manage my time right but the first few weeks might be tough but we will all find a routine. I’ve learned after this first week that I can work 30/40 hours but i need to make sure it’s at consistent times and that I have afternoons/evenings to sit down and focus.

    • kell2488 says:

      Hello everyone my name is TJ I’m excited and nervous to be here. Haven’t been in school for a few years now and I never did like it so I decided to teach it. I love kids, I have two of them (3.5 and 3 months), and want to help them. Currently I work at Eugene CrossFit and I not only coach adults but I run the teens program there and currently have 20-25 kids on/off depending on the season. I love working with them and what they teach me when I’m with them, this is why I want to teach PE and Health at the MS/HS level. My questions are 1) How in the world do I change the student I was into the student I need to be? and 2) When do I find or create time to get it all done with two kids, a wife, and a job?

      • jesse says:

        “How in the world do I change the student I was into the student I need to be?”

        This is a great question. Although I was technically ‘successful’ in undergrad, I was not a good student. I need to learn all sorts of organizational skills, time management, etc. I don’t even have kids or a job and I’m struggling with these things.

        • pitt2892 says:

          I have the same fears. I am convinced that as an undergrad I was a lot less disciplined than I will need to be in this program. It’s like learning how to learn and study for the first time. It’s great that you have your wife to help with your little ones!

      • lynn3392 says:

        Hi TJ,
        I have found and seen that when someone is choosing their own path and really wants, they can change the type of student they were. You are not the same person as you were then therefor how can you be the same kind of student. I would start by finding an organizing system that works for you. There are apps to help remind you when homework is due, and hourly schedules might help.
        As far as getting it all done, try focusing on smaller tasks. I also have a job, husband, and 2 kids. For me I schedule and print stuff. I can carry and read on my way to the coffee machine or taking the elevator easier if the item is on paper. It’s also easier to read in the car. ( I’m dyslexic so reading on phones and computers is more challenging for me to remember what I read. I also find a notification can distract me. paper doesn’t have notifications that pop up. 🙂 )I’m currently typing this while stuffing my face on lunch at work and trying to avoid getting refried beans on my keyboard. Break the big items into little items. You can read your articles to your 3 month old in dulcet fun tones. Kiddo will have your attention and you will get stuff done. The 3.5yr old is a little harder but have found making a little bit of time here and there, like reading to my daughter while she takes her bath makes her feel special and that she has her time. I also gave her workbooks so she can do homework while I do home work. I used to tell her she was helping me. As for the spouse part, I have found constantly checking in helps. Examples: when I get up to get a snack I walk over and hug or kiss him quick. (we are a physical couple), he and I have agreed to meet for 15 min each night to talk about what’s going on in the next couple of days. I have found these little check ins really help him deal with the decrease in attention.
        I hope these ideas help. Just know you are not alone and that this life work balance is not a guru on a mountain but a tight rope walker with a pole getting stuff tossed at them. It’s a minute by minute re-balance.
        Holly

        • pitt2892 says:

          Thanks for all those tips Holly! I like the “checking in” part. I think I need to talk to my husband about implementing that kind of thing. As for the kid thing, I have four and they are busy! Maybe having the materials in paper will be more effective when I take them to dance or soccer. I can just start reading and not have to be “plugged in.” Thanks!

        • vand7393 says:

          Holly,

          You are going to be a huge addition to our cohort. I love the way you explain things. Keep up the good work. You are a great teacher.

          -Tyler

        • TJ says:

          Thanks so much Holly, a lot of good info in here. I will be sure to try them out and see if they work. Thanks again!

    • mccl5095 says:

      Hi all. I’m Amanda.
      This past spring/summer I’ve been working on native and edible landscapes in people’s yards around town, as well as babysitting two kiddos whose parents run a raw milk dairy farm, and running my own mini business cooking weekly meals for a couple folks. The previous three years I worked for an organic farm. This time of the year, I’m used to hauling hundreds of pounds of winter squash in from the field, planting garlic, harvesting apples, tearing out tomato plants, seeding spinach… well, you get the picture. I am thrilled to become a teacher, but I am just a little turned around being back in school. After finishing up my undergraduate education with a degree in environmental science, my head was full of dire information about our planet, our political and economic systems, our communities, etc. I was burned out from school, I had to physically do something for the greater good, a little repentance if you will, which led me to farming. It was good to get my hands dirty, philosophize with food growers, develop a connection to the land and the seasons. I suppose I hope to bring some of that real-world connection to the students I end up teaching. Lessons have to be applicable to real life! I hope to instil in students a sense of wonder along with a feeling of strength and optimism for tackling future challenges. I’m excited to delve into some research and figure out how to make some of my teaching goals a reality.

      • pitt2892 says:

        I love this! I have always secretly wanted to be out in the elements and doing work with my hands but never took the leap. I think those experiences will only enhance your effectiveness as a teacher. Being relatable is, in my mind, a strong tool toward reaching your students. Awesome!

      • puck5811 says:

        I’m convinced that the reason the environment is being destroyed is because it happens without us noticing it. And that is mostly because of the divorce from nature that modernity has imposed. Despite the circus, all we really need is food, shelter, clothing, and love. If children can be taught to understand that our world is not a stockpile of resources from which to prosper, but our home from which we must modestly take only what we need to make what we need, then the future of the planet will immediately be brightened. The question is, will the thirst for technology even permit such a future. I guess we’ll just turn on some apple-rigged virtual environments that fool our senses and sap our souls.

        • mccl5095 says:

          Yes, I’d like to cultivate in students a sense of place (this requires the ability to really see the world around them(have you heard of plant blindness)), as well as a connection to community. How will we prevent kids from turning into robots?

      • thom3640 says:

        Hey Amanda,

        I’m curious if you are considering gardening/farming as part of your topic. Today we talked a bit about garden programs when I mentioned Abernethy Elementary in Portland and their garden program and you told me about The Village School. I’d be interested in hearing about where your research takes you. I love programs like this!

        • mccl5095 says:

          Yes! Will be posting my topic soon. I’m interested in incorporating even broader environmental education into the classroom, I know it as environmental literacy. I think garden education programs are wonderful, but I’d like to take it a few steps further, toward “let’s talk about those seeds you planted today, let’s connect that to our history lesson and guess what, it also ties in with our science lesson”… basically, how to teach students that everything is connected, and what that means for the big picture, and what that means for them.

    • monn4522 says:

      Just realized I replied on the wrong thread. Here’s what I wrote above:
      Hi everyone,
      I’m Jessica. I’ve known I wanted to be a teacher for a long time now, but I was so unsure of exactly what I wanted to teach it took me a long time to get around to starting a teaching program. I’m glad to be here with you all! I’ve worked with kids in a few different contexts. I was a T.A. for two years in college for a couple different art history courses. I’ve also volunteered in schools, most recently with the SMART program at Cesar Chavez Elementary. I’ve enjoyed every grade level I worked with, but have decided I want to teach middle or high school because I find the content more interesting. I’m sure I will have many questions, but right now I am trying to take everything day by day. Mostly I am concerned with balancing school and work. I’m looking forward to getting to know everyone this term.

      • mccl5095 says:

        What is the SMART program all about? -Amanda

        • monn4522 says:

          Hi Amanda,
          SMART stands for start making a reader today. It’s a program that is statewide (I think). Basically, every kindergarten and first grade student has a volunteer that comes into their classroom once a week and reads with them. They also get to take home two books every month. The goal is to get them excited about reading.

    • kipl9798 says:

      Hey all!
      My name is Maddie and I am actually from Eugene. I graduated from Oregon State University with an undergrad in Human Development and Families Sciences-Early Childhood Elementary option. Most of my experience working with kiddos was done overseas for a program called Camp Adventure where I worked on different military installations, for 3-5 months at a time, providing child support programs for enlisted families. One of my initial reasons for getting into Camp Adventure was for the free travel opportunity, but after completing my first contract, I had discovered my passion for working with youth and it would be the fuel to drive me into completing the program a total of 9 times.
      But aside from working with kids, I enjoy being active and participating in outdoor related pursuits. I played basketball at Linn Benton and Lane Community College and loved my experiences at both campuses. Coaching basketball in the future is often something I contemplate. Im excited to be able to obtain a Health and P.E. endorsement and look forward to seeing where all of this takes me!
      My burning question is the same as Chelsea’s…How am I going to get it all done and balance school with my work schedule? (Yikes)

      • page3603 says:

        Hey Maddie,
        I know we talked about this before in our ESOL class, but you really should think about international teaching! With your love for travel and working with kids it would be a great fit, and with your desire to coach MS/HS sports you would have even more opportunities to travel because at international schools most of the sports competitions occur in different countries where multiple international schools compete against each other!
        – Kyla

      • vand7393 says:

        Maddie,
        Where did you work overseas at? Were you playing basketball while you were over there? That is awesome. Coaching is very rewarding if you haven’t coached yet I recommend you start as soon as possible.

        – Tyler

      • kenn6317 says:

        Hi Maddie, I’m also an OSU Alum! I have a degree in Exercise and Sport Science and also want to teach Health/PE. I agree, it’s going to be tough to balance school with a full time job. We can do it!

    • emer3389 says:

      Hello hi!
      My name is Joe. I want to teach high school science or health/PE. The reason I want to become a teacher is because I love inspiring people. Pushing people to success is a wonderful thing to be a part of. Unfortunately I was never inspired until college, so my goal is to get people excited to learn before they have to pay for it. Some things about me I am extremely quiet until I am comfortable, it takes about a week or 2 and then I am become outgoing. I have a dry sense of humor. I spend most my time with my dog Fire Lord Zuko and managing a Dutch Bros (so I can always make coffee runs on the late nights). I also love numbers and can usually help if you have any issues with excel. I am extremely excited to have such a small class because I already feel comfortable with all of you after a week. I have had 2 years off since my undergrad so my biggest worry is regaining my healthy time management skills.

      • kenn6317 says:

        Hey Joe, I’m sure you’ll adjust to school life after taking a couple of years off. I’m in the same boat as I finished 5 years ago. I’ll be an adjustment, but we’ll get back into the swing of things.

      • hick0029 says:

        Hey Joe!
        Glad to be here with a fellow food industry manager! I’m Glad you have found an area of life to be passionate about! I bet you could teach me a few lessons in time management and I look forward to collaborating with you in that area!
        – Carson

    • bish4477 says:

      Erik here,

      Love seeing how many people have worked in teaching internationally. I look forward to getting to know folks.

      I’m more than a little anxious about being back at school again, again, again. I started college back when MTV still played music videos and it was mostly Pearl Jam & Nirvana. This is my fourth degree. (ug)

      I’d like to teach Art and STE[A]M at a Title 1 middle school. I have a M.Arch from the UO so it also makes sense that I might end up teaching architecture and drafting at a High School.

      I did work in architecture for awhile but The Great Recession wasn’t kind to architects and layoffs became the norm. I decided to move to greener pastures in 2012. I currently own a solo commercial (mostly architecture) photography business. Things are crazy busy.

      I’ve done some teaching at the college level and have volunteered quite a bit at my son’s middle school in Springfield. I also have a daughter in the 3rd grand and my wife works for The Ford Family Foundation working with scholarship recipients and alumni.

      Looking forward to the next 16 months. Not sure how I’m going to manage it all… here goes nothing!

    • silv3268 says:

      Hi there, I’m Katie. Ever since I was a little girl, I wanted to be a teacher. I don’t really know why, it just seemed like a good thing to do. My childhood dreams, however, didn’t exactly materialize as planned. In college, I thought about teaching, but discovered I couldn’t study education AND major in Spanish, minor in music, study abroad, work part-time, and captain the ultimate frisbee team. So I abandoned my teacher plans. After college, I moved to Seattle, worked a lot of odd jobs and played a lot of frisbee. And then one day, fate intervened and found myself moving back home to Idaho and applying for a job at a local elementary school. The position was called English Learner Teacher’s Aide, but really I was running the EL program at the school. It was a tough gig, but I liked it. I liked it so much I decided I wanted to keep doing it, but also get paid. So I applied for the MAT program at Pacific and here I am today. I am working part-time for the Social Work program (you might see me at the front desk), but other than that, I will mostly just be doing school. I plan to do Elementary/Multiple Subjects, and also the ESOL and bilingual endorsements. I’m excited about school and also nervous and overwhelmed. My research ideas so far revolve around ESOL students, possibly L1/L2 learning strategies or the topic of identity and culture in education. I haven’t jumped into any research yet so my burning question right now is…how do I stay organized? Finding/reading research online seems daunting. Do I download/print/save things? Whats the best way to take notes? Perhaps some of this will become evident as I get going. Any tips would be great!

    • vand7393 says:

      Hello class, this is Tyler Vanderhoff. I currently am an Education Assistant and Hamlin middle school and a Varsity Assistant Football Coach at South Eugene High School. Yes, I am going 7 days a week right now and I am not sure yet if I have bit off more than I can chew or not. I guess time will tell? I look forward to learning more about becoming a teacher and sharing my experiences with you all as well as hearing your stories.

    • bans6315 says:

      Hi all,
      My name is Phoenix, and it’s a chosen name. I find the meanings of words, and how we describe ourselves, to be very important. They give us hope, express fear or worry, and either limit us or open possibilities.

      In the case of my name, I had to reevaluate who I was after surviving a series of life upheavals. I realized I was a different person entirely. The name reflected that process of rebirth.

      I had always liked Gardner’s theories of multiple intelligences. I was identified as having Intrapersonal intelligence, essentially knowing yourself and using your personal lens to decipher the world around you. Whether its an intelligence or just part of who I am, I certainly do find the process of self-examination to be important.

      I have loved teaching since I was a small child playing pretend with other children. I was always the teacher, making up actual lessons, which I managed to convince the other children were “fun.” That’s still how I think of teaching. If there isn’t any fun, it’s going to be difficult to help them learn it.

      I want to learn how to evaluate educational programs. I am a teacher at a private school with little training but I try to find the best curriculum and build from it. Having the research skills to look at options and have an idea what will help my students succeed will be so helpful.

      And lastly, I’m a writer. In case the long post wasn’t obvious.

      I look forward to learning with all of you. 🙂

      • bans6315 says:

        Oh darn, I meant to put my question at the end. I am wondering what kind of research method will work best as I investigate the interaction between twice exceptional status and gender?

        I want to know both about the experience children have, and outcomes of how they are assisted in their learning. I am new to research, and I am excited to learn.

    • kenn6317 says:

      Hi all, I’m Tyler! My passion for teaching started years ago when I worked as a campus supervisor at a high school in Albany. While finishing my undergrad, I also coached football and track, which solidified my interest in teaching. I love working with high school aged kids. Seeing them succeed is awesome, especially when they get the “ah hah, I get it” look on their face. I’ve worked for a hospital organization for the past 5 years, and have decided it’s time to get back into education. I’m looking forward to this experience and can’t wait to have a classroom of my own. I’m hoping to teach health/PE and coach as well.

    • krop5065 says:

      Hi all!

      My name is Rebecca Krop. I moved to Eugene two years ago after finishing my undergraduate degree (History and Women’s Studies), to be closer to my sister, who had lived out here for several years already. I spent my first year teaching writing classes at A3 (a charter school in Springfield), and soon realized that teaching was a passion of mine. I joined the program because I want more educational opportunities beyond the charter setting, and, of course, to learn how to be a better teacher.
      Things to know about me: I’m a born and raised Floridian, but spent most of my summers growing up hiking in the Appalachian mountains. Being outside is my comfort zone, and I try to make this happen as much as possible.
      You’ll all find out soon enough that my humor is mostly word play, and I’ll never miss out on a chance to hearor share a new pun. I love history, particularly the Progressive Era in the U.S, and Women in Italy during the Renaissance.
      Welp, that’s all you need to know for now.
      I hope to get to know you all better as the semester goes on!

      • krop5065 says:

        My burning question stems from a curiosity/worry…
        I’ve never conducted quantitative research before, so I’m nervous about the process, but also curious to see how it compares to qualitative research. So I’m really curious about the difference in how my brain works with different methodologies.

        Also, I’m interested in how the brain reacts to different logical processes. E.g., Does the brain process information in a different way when performing inductive vs. deductive reasoning?

    • catl6633 says:

      About me, I’m originally from Bozeman MT and moved to Eugene when I was 5 years old. Graduated from South Eugene High School in 1990. I love fishing, and going for adventures. I also have a good knowledge of wines of the world. I have been playing music since I can remember, but really got into guitar and bass as I got older. I played around the Northwest in bands and got fed up of playing with people who didn’t seem to really know what they were doing or how to communicate music very well. This led me to go through the LCC music program. I got along well with academics after not knowing how I would do after a long break from school. I got very interested in History taking History of Western Civilization. I transferred to UO Music School where I took bass and guitar lessons going through the jazz side of school. I also coordinated two Willamette Valley Folk Festivals. After graduating I moved to NYC with my eye on making a splash in the big apple. I worked as a bartender and server and several bands.

      While in New York City I started doing a Korean Yoga program which led me to Seoul, South Korea where I taught English in academies and a Public middle school. I got to travel to Japan, Taiwan, Thailand, England, France, Spain, Italy, and Mexico (my mom, brother and family live there still) during this time. I moved back here to Eugene five years ago and have been working at Kalapuya High School as an EA/Health Assistant and doing freelance music, mostly as a guitarist. I had been thinking about getting my Masters in Education for a long time as I really enjoy teaching and found that I do great in a class setting.

      My purpose for going into this program is to teach at a Middle or High School as a Social Studies and or Music teacher. This course I see will prepare me for the academic world in a way that will really help me grow and become much more knowledgeable about teaching academia and the language that is used.

      My most burning question is: How am I going to navigate all this on-line material and all the new educational jargon?

      • hick0029 says:

        Hey! I’m right there with you! Trying to navigate all this new vocabulary and material is crazy! Hope we can look back in 18 months and see how far we’ve come!
        – Carson

    • hick0029 says:

      Hello everyone!
      Sorry for posting this late. I want to apologize for not being on top of this and not interacting with you all. So with that said…

      My name is Carson Hickox and I am returning to school to pursue my masters degree in teaching after a seven year absence from school. It’s been sort of a long road to get to this point in my life. My wife and I spent a long time thinking over what I wanted to pursue as a career and that lead to a lot of really great conversations about our vision for our life and our values as we pursued starting a family. Through a round about away I started to think over the idea of being a teacher, an idea that had never entered my mind until about a year ago. I have spend the last 10 or so years of my life working with youth in a couple faith based non profits as a volunteer and a staff member. As recently as this current fall I have been working with YoungLife in the Springfield at the high school. My wife and I have had a huge heart for the students in that area and my eventual hope is to teach and coach baseball at the middle school or high school level in springfield. We love the kids and we hope to be in the area for many years to come. I hope that education is a place where I can be solid role model and a consistent presence in these kids lives and help expand what they know or think they could know.

      Currently I work as EA at Hamlin Middle School in Springfield, Oregon I have been married to my wife Kalah for 2 years in February and we are expecting our first child, a boy, in October! When I’m not working I really enjoy running, watching NY Mets Baseball, eating really good food, and listening to singer/songwriter music! I look forward to working and collaborating with all of you this year!

      My question for this course is: Do I have the mental capacity to critique scholarly articles? Haha I know that sounds strange but sometimes I wonder if I am smart enough to break down what these experts have found.
      – Carson

      • fouq2882 says:

        I would say, yes! We all have our areas of expertise that we bring to the table, and we can use these lenses to look at a problem in a different way than somebody else did. It’s not always about knowing more than somebody else. We often learn just as much when we adjust our perspective. Also, I guess you could do a ton of research on a given topic, and then use your knowledge to critique somebody else’s work on the same topic if you wanted to go that route.

      • catl6633 says:

        Sounds like you have done a lot of great things in the community you live in. Working with kids is a great way to continue that. I’ve recently gotten back into enjoying watching baseball with the world series last year. Working as a teacher is a great way to stay involved with your kids over the years. I was thinking about all the new material to go over too. It is a little daunting, but with perseverance and time you will get it!

        -Kurt

  14. Todd Twyman says:

    Respond to this thread:

    Which research tradition resonates the most with you? Why?

    • pede3730 says:

      After reading Module 1, the research tradition that I am most familiar with from my high school and undergraduate days would be descriptive research. At the end of every term at Oregon State the students were given a survey to rate the class, the teacher, etc. Also, just in everyday life it seems like there are endless amounts of surveys about customer service, product quality, you name it, so I think we are all extremely familiar with descriptive research.
      However, the tradition I think would be most applicable to my topic of interest would be casual-comparative research. My topic will have to do with childhood obesity and technological “screen time,” given there is enough research about it, and this method seems to fit best. I am hoping I will find studies that establish some sort of cause-effect relationship between children who are obese and the amount of time they spend in front of a screen. That eliminates correlational research because correlational research does not attempt to establish a cause-effect relationship. Experimental research is eliminated too because it requires a controlled environment with a manipulated variable. Descriptive research could be used to determine how much time children spend in front of a screen, exercising, etc. but it does not establish a relationship between those variables.

    • pitt2892 says:

      I feel as if I have a limited amount of research experience and have yet to develop a tried-and-true method. I assume that you mean what method do I gravitate toward?

    • fouq3376 says:

      The quantitative research method that resonated most with me while reading this is experimental research. The biggest factor for why is the fact that you have control over the variables and are able to manipulate them to fit your study. As with casual-comparative, you are still able to examine the cause/effect relationship, but I think you would have a more in-depth perspective on the relationship since you are able to control what happens and other factors. In an ideal situation, however, I would use the other applicable types of research before delving into my own experimental research. For example, if I was trying to find out the effects of playing classical music during a test, I might first take polls or give questionnaires (descriptive research) to measure thoughts around playing music so that I can control for other factors or to see if my sample might be bias.

    • fouq2882 says:

      Experimental research resonates with me more than the other traditions because the researcher has more control over the situation, or experiment. It is not simply that the researcher can pick the variable they want to test, but they can control for other factors that might influence results. This allows the researcher a better opportunity to identify a cause and effect relationship rather than identifying correlations. As is often said, correlation does not equal causation.
      However, as stated in Module 1, experimental research is not always appropriate. In addition, it is not always possible. Sometimes, it is not realistic to develop a setting in which outside variables can be controlled. Such settings are not necessarily indicative of the real world. A researcher may develop an ideal study for testing the effectiveness of spelling textbooks in third-grade in which all external factors which could influence performance are controlled.. When the “best” textbooks are rolled out across a district or state though, outside variables will come into play. As sure as researchers are about their findings in a controlled setting, real world applications do not always produce the hoped for results.

    • page3603 says:

      The research tradition that resonates the most with me is the casual-comparative research method. Finding a cause-effect relationship appeals to me because I have always liked understanding the ‘why’ behind things we do. I was always the student who needed to understand why things are done a certain way in order to process the information effectively, especially with subjects I struggle with. Correlational research is extremely beneficial for determining that something has an effect on something else, but it does nothing to mitigate all of the confounding variables. I feel like I would have trouble not injecting my personal opinions as to what caused the effect because I like knowing why, but that is not the purpose of that kind of research. On the other end of the spectrum is experimental research where I would have complete control over the variables in order to test a relationship that I think may exist between them. There are two reasons why this is not my preferred method, however. First is the question of ethics. It would be very difficult in a school setting to manipulate variables in a way that does not impact the quality of education that students are receiving, especially with my interest on the topic of curriculum. It would be unethical (and illegal, I believe) to provide one group with nationally-mandated curriculum, and another with my own self-made curriculum, especially if I have the opinion that one works better than the other. In that situation, all students should have the opportunity to go with the curriculum that would increase their chances for learning. My second dilemma with experimental research is the chance for human error or research bias. Unless there is a variety of experiments all showing the same result, I have a hard time trusting that the research was not tampered with to support their hypothesis. As a researcher, I would be worried that others would share this view when examining my own research. With that said, casual-comparative research examines pre-existing groups, which reduces the risk for researcher bias.

    • puck5811 says:

      I sense the most acute resonance when pondering causal-comparative research, as it seems the most natural, direct, and yet, non-invasive, method to isolate and identify the contributing factors of whatever the problem in the classroom maybe. But a second, nearly equally-intriguing sort of research is single-subject experimental research, as teaching is but training. Just as seeds planted show various signs of vigor and possibilities for growth, the individual approach to each is vital for maximal expression of potential. Therefore, the chance to employ various educational stimulae with an individual over time, charting the growth and progress usually obfuscated from the teacher by time, distance, class size and number thereof, is an awesome proposition, as to me nothing is quite as satisfying as successfully and intentionally directing growth to the benefit of the organism and observing the fruition of such direction.

    • hick0029 says:

      I am really interested in experimental research. I like the idea of manipulating variables and seeing the effect that has. I’m always fascinated by the placebo effect and weather or not if one is subjected to changes without their knowledge what their response is. I think of specifically of a group of teenagers that are similar and placing them in two different classroom structures one more authoritative and one more loose and seeing how the students understand the course material after each class. It would be interesting to know the effect rules and expectation have on a group of kids. This could verge on the idea of causal comparative research as well, that is seeing if there is a link between classes with more set and enforced expectations and students understanding the material.

    • silv3268 says:

      As I read through Module 1, I came to the description of Qualitative research and I thought, “Ah, this sounds like my kind of research.” Qualitative research stood out to me in contrast to quantitative research because of the emphasis on testing the values or perceptions of a few people, instead of the statistical analysis of many. If I had to choose, I would pick words over numbers and small groups over large any day. I am also drawn to the organization of information being tested in qualitative research. I like details and patterns and exploring the deeper meaning of topics. This fits the qualitative research goal of gathering data from a small sample and organizing it into patterns or categories. It also fits the idea that qualitative research can promote a deeper understanding or the “why” of a topic.

      • krop5065 says:

        I definitely enjoy qualitative research over quantitative, but I’ll recognize my bias and admit that this may be because I have only a little experience with quantitative research. Still, I have always gravitated towards verbal, written, or perceptual interactions, rather than working with numerical data. I prefer to explore patterns, and make predictions on how social trends or particular events can affect lives. My preference for qualitative research is also rooted in my interest in history, which I think is difficult to approach with quantitative methodology. Qualitative research also feels more forgiving, because you generally don’t have to be concerned with variables or control groups. Finally, the personal interactions that are possible with qualitative research make the method more attractive to me.

    • krop5065 says:

      So I accidentally made this a comment on someone else’s post earlier, so I’m reposting it here. Anyways…

      I definitely enjoy qualitative research over quantitative, but I’ll recognize my bias and admit that this may be because I have only a little experience with quantitative research. Still, I have always gravitated towards verbal, written, or perceptual interactions, rather than working with numerical data. I prefer to explore patterns, and make predictions on how social trends or particular events can affect lives. My preference for qualitative research is also rooted in my interest in history, which I think is difficult to approach with quantitative methodology. Qualitative research also feels more forgiving, because you generally don’t have to be concerned with variables or control groups. Finally, the personal interactions that are possible with qualitative research make the method more attractive to me.

    • thom3640 says:

      After reading about the different kinds of research, I spent some time thinking about the kinds of research I have participated in as a subject and I really could only remember qualitative studies- I participated in a couple mock trials at one point and as Kyle mentioned, have always completed opinion surveys in classes and other areas. So, I guess qualitative research resonates more with me as I’m more experienced with it personally. I also feel personally, that I am better at interpreting qualitative data (values, attitudes etc) than numerical figures.I would, however, like to improve at evaluating and interpreting quantitative data!

    • mccl5095 says:

      Perhaps this will seem like I am unable to choose which research method I like best, but it makes the most sense to me to use both quantitative and qualitative research together. There was a brief mention of this in the module – “the two methods can work together for a more complete understanding of a concept or topic” – I agree with this. Quantitative studies (like survey results) often leave me wanting more details, and qualitative studies often need to be connected to the bigger picture. I think good research should utilize both methods, particularly in education, where generalizations are very often impossible to make. An effective approach might be to utilize ‘descriptive research’ in order to identify patterns, and then investigate those patterns through qualitative research. Certainly numbers are important, but in order to understand the numbers and figure out the ‘why’ questions, often the researcher needs to dig deeper into more nuanced qualitative research.

    • kipl9798 says:

      After reading and reflecting on module 1, the research methods that resonate most with me are correlational research and causal-comparative. I like correlational research because I am generally interested in figuring out relationships among things. My brain has a hunger to sort new information and when it is given the relationship of multiple variables, it is quickly absorbs this information and easily stores its nutrients in the appropriate category. Similarly, I also like causal-comparative research because it provides my brain with more information that is easy to sort. When I know why something happens, I am able to remember information much more efficiently.

    • ophe4482 says:

      The research tradition that most resonates with me is applied research. I have very little research experience in academia, but as a parent and preschool teacher, the applied research is most often used even without thought or intent. When a child is having a hard time focusing, I will read about ways to keep a child engaged and apply it to my lessons. If it works, I continue with the new method. If it does not, I will try another method. It is at that point, I have unknowingly used the evaluation approach. It appears that our entire life experience and many of our life’s decisions are based on methods of research.

      • Jake says:

        Qualitative research resonates the most with me. I am quite gregarious and enjoy being around people. Qualitative research would allow me to do what I love: work with and talk to people. I am particularly attracted to observational data and one on one interviews. While in college, I remember gaining many new perspectives on my research topic my conducting individual interviews. While I know the module mentions it is difficult, if not impossible, to generalize qualitative research, I think it the most effective research tool in obtaining current and up to date opinions on the topic of research while also allowing the researcher to have meaningful interactions with the people affected by the topic.

    • jesse says:

      I honestly don’t know.

      I think it depends on context. I mean, is this in regard to which type of studies I prefer to read, or which types of research I am more likely to accept as accurate? Which type of research I would personally be interested in, were I in a position to conduct some sort of research?

      Or is it more basic, like what type of research I do when deciding which products to buy? (right now I have a separate tab open to search for “what is the best knife sharpener?”)
      Depending on context, I think we’ll all have different answers.

      I think correlational research is particularly interesting because you can determine strange and unexpected connections between people. Not that the connections have any meaning. I read an interview once, I think with Nate Silver of fivethirtyeight, about how people who sleep on their sides, vs their back, are more likely to also have a series of other similarities. Things that have nothing to do with each other, but hint at the possibility of hidden patterns of human behavior. So, I think correlational research is interesting as a ‘did you know…’ type of factoid, but not something I would actively pursue.

      I think the type of research I’m most likely to come across while researching my chosen topic for this course will be causal-comparative research. Specifically with research around education, it seems more likely that people will be examining established data and looking for connection, rather than having the opportunity to actually control or manipulate any variables.

    • ward4486 says:

      After reading Module 1, the research tradition that I seem to be most familiar with is descriptive research. The reason being is that throughout my entire educational experience I have been asked to fill out multiple questionnaires, surveys and polls that result in teachers and others getting feedback. This feedback could be how I felt the course was going, what could be changed to better a program or my understanding of the content being taught. This research was typically written in a simple form with yes or no questions, on a scale system or on a continuum. Not only have I been involved in completing this type of research questionnaire, I have also conducted them myself for classes and extra curricular activities that were given to students and the community.

      As far as the type of research I believe will be best for my research topic on childhood obesity and nutrition correlated to academic success in students, I believe the most accurate will be correlational research and casual-comparative research. That is, given the circumstances of not being able to conduct my own research where I am the conductor and could change the variables. I am looking forward to learning more about all types of research that I will be able to apply to all aspects of my teaching and learning.

    • TJ says:

      I have two methods that speak the most to me which seems to be more common than I expected. Maybe it is a good thing and I’m well rounded, probably not but who knows, worth a shot. Anyway they are qualitative research and casual-comparative.

      Qualitative because of my undergrad in Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies. I used this method a lot because it was a lot about your own attitude or understanding of the work or research we were required to read and comprehend. It was very opinionated and didn’t really rely on facts. So based on that it speaks to me.

      On the other hand casual-comparative research interests me because of what I want to do my research on. Nutrition and obesity and how these factors influence or affect injuries and self-esteem issues. The cause-effect factor would be a good tool (IMO) when looking at these issues. How does having poor nutrition or being obese affect your chance of having an injury or positively/negatively affect your self-esteem.

    • Phoenix says:

      After reading about the different methods of quantitative research, I find myself drawn to causal-comparative research. This type of research is about examining data to determine if cause-effect relationships exist between groups by focusing on an independent characteristic of behavior and its influence on another characteristic or behavior. Part of what makes this useful for me is that I currently have only one independent variable, gender, in my question:

      “How does gender (independent variable) affect teacher response (dependent variable) to twice exceptional students?”

      For the beginning of digging into the subject I can look at causal-comparative research to find broad outlines of patterns. There may be studies about which gender receives more assistance, or is more frequently supported in literacy vs mathematics. These studies on existing patterns can then help me develop my next wave of research.

    • emer3389 says:

      After reading module 1 I would say that experimental research resonates the most with me. With my bachelors degree being in human physiology experimental research is what I became most comfortable with. I think that it is the most fun to do because you get to have more control and manipulate a variable. When reading experimental research papers it is easy to focus on what they are testing and why. When I run this type of experiment I find the data analysis to be easier for me to comprehend what it means. The biggest reason they resonate with me is because they are fun and open up a realm of creativity for the researcher and the reader.

    • pitt2892 says:

      Okay I am a nerd and thoroughly read through the WHOLE module 1 task sheet and retract my earlier, ditzier question. I am now prepared to answer which research tradition I lean toward.

      In my limited research experience associated with my education and life in general I feel like I am the most familiar with descriptive research and experimental research. I actually enjoy filling out surveys and questionnaires and believe that they can provide helpful feedback that can invoke real change. I also remember conducting experimental research in high school science. Experimental research to me feels more quantifiable, objective and accurate. However, in education I feel like it might be more difficult to impose a truly objective study in a more emotional, often abstract situation where you are trying out new educational methods or dealing with people in general.
      I think that casual-comparative research may prove to be the most effective method for the type of information I am collecting. I am interested in studying classroom management techniques and how that related to disruptive students. I think that looking for a cause and effect pattern will be important in my research in order to develop an infrastructure of management tools. Plus I feel like that is the technique that I can most easily understand, if I am being completely honest.

    • kenn6317 says:

      The research tradition that resonates with me most is descriptive research. I have used this style of research before in previous undergrad classes where in one instance, my group and I created poll questions regarding nutrition and supplementation. I was able to visit high school health classes, where I was able to gain a better understanding of the percentage of students who do use supplements and those who didn’t. They were also asked include the types supplements they were currently using or had used in the past, which included multi vitamins, protein, creatine, etc. I then used the data collected from the students responses to reveal in my paper that an elective class involving nutrition and supplements would benefit the student body, especially those involved in athletics.
      I feel that descriptive research would also be the research tradition I’d chose with my topic (Childhood Obesity). I’d be able to collect data over a continuum, for example; on a scale of 1-5, how likely are you to choose a sugared beverage over water to drink with dinner? Or perhaps a yes/no question such as, do you engage in 30 minutes of physical activity after school? This type of research best suites my topic as I’d collect data about existing conditions and perceptions.

    • norr4573 says:

      The research technique I lean towards is casual-comparative. I like the idea of being able to find a cause and effect relationship. I always want to know why things happen the way they do. At first I was drawn towards correlational research because I like the idea of noticing trends but then I remembered how many times I have said the phrase “correlation does not equal causation!”. It’s nice to be able to see trends but in my mind it’s useless if we don’t know why something is happening. If we know why something is happening it makes it easier to change it, or repeat desired results. Casual-comparative research seems like a way to get definitive information without being invasive to research subjects. In experimental research variables are deliberately manipulated which seems unnatural and could affect research outcomes.

    • catl6633 says:

      I’d say Experimental Research resonates with me the most as I’m looking to do cross-curriculum or mindfulness as a research topic. Because you can control several variables in a few groups. Having taught several grades in middle school in Korea the same targets for the week but having to change the challenge according to their grade and level of functioning. I’d like to be able to change some of the variables in my study. It would be interesting to see what happened in different classes when the variables were changed and was it that particular class or the variables that changed the outcome. I like the idea of finding the cause and effect of manipulating how the class goes to see if, like an optometrist says: “any better, any worse, one or two”. Also being able to pick groups that might be more attracted to, neutral or repelled to the particulars of the study is also interesting to see how they took on the theory of the study. I was always intrigued by the study done on basketball players where some of them just practiced, some only visualized practice, and some did not practice at all. As I remember the team that visualized did as well if not better than the one that only practiced. That study was more mindfulness, but I would also like to see how it could fit with cross-curriculum as well. I’ll be teaching social studies and music, so it seems like it would fit well with both of them.

    • monn4522 says:

      I think it depends on what the researcher is aiming to learn. When there is a specific problem the best method of research is often pretty apparent. In a general sense, though, the type that resonates with me is experimental research because it produces tangible data which is (hopefully) harder to refute. I tend to feel more comfortable drawing conclusions and trusting the results from these sort of experiments when I read about them. However, for my purposes in this program and in this course, it seems like experimental research will be the least useful.

    • bish4477 says:

      I’m finding a pull toward “descriptive research.” Being able to identify trends and “realities” of a situation or condition is significant to me. When an organization, such as a school or school district, is attempting to make a change to, for example, improve test scores or increase graduation rates, assumptions have to be made. Those assumptions are often the foundation of the “change.” As with a building, if that foundation is flawed, the entire project can come crashing down. Descriptive research helps to create a strong foundation on which to build a procedure for adjustment or change.

      Descriptive research can also involve the use of surveys, interviews, polls and/or questionnaires. I appreciate an opportunity to actually crunch the numbers of a study. Finding trends and patterns to support a study is exciting. As is discovering surprises that may turn things in another direction. The end result is significant… having REAL data to back up an idea or to implement meaningful change.

  15. Todd Twyman says:

    Respond to this thread too:

    Teacher action research is a method for educational practitioners to engage in the assessment and improvement of their own practice. It can be an individual tool, helping classroom teachers reconsider their teaching methods or to adapt in order to solve a problem.
    http://www.edchange.org/multicultural/tar.html

    What’s your definition?

    • fouq3376 says:

      Action research is a way for communities to take a problem, evaluate that problem, find ways to change that problem, and see how those changes are affecting the community. It is a continuous cycle of improvement and a way for the community as a whole to learn and grow by helping themselves.

    • fouq2882 says:

      Action research is worthwhile because it is relevant and important. Because topics of research are chosen by those who will execute the research and directly apply the findings, it is immediately relevant. In addition, because the researchers have the ability to choose topics or projects that are applicable to their practice, findings take on an added level of importance.

    • pede3730 says:

      The Journal of Teacher Action Research (JTAR) defines action research “as teachers (at all levels) studying their practice and/or their students’ learning in a methodical way in order to inform classroom practice.”
      To me, this means that teachers evaluate their own teaching methods/practice, determine if there are any problems, and altering their methods as necessary to solve those problems.

    • page3603 says:

      To my understanding, action research is a term used to describe the research done within educational communities to improve the conditions and quality of services they can provide as a collaborative team. It is a process of questioning the current methods and processes in which we do things within the education system, examining ways in which we can change or modify them to better suit the needs of everyone within the academic community (students, teachers, parents, administrators, etc.), and evaluating the outcomes. It is a continual process of questioning, modifying, and hopefully improving the way we do things to improve the education system as a whole.

    • puck5811 says:

      T.A.R. is a combination of efforts brought forth by all personally contributing parties in education. It begins with the classroom, in the classroom. The teacher can at no time be sure about a)the applicable content of his lesson plan b)the success of various exercises therein. Every lesson is a conflagration of experimentation directed by the teacher, aiming for certain results but ready to adapt. This idea stretches outwards like student tentacles into the community where problems can also be observed and rectified by social action. In general, a T.A.R. school community atmosphere is one in which the educational approach is constantly evolving to address an ever-changing reality, an atmosphere that is more can-do than is.

    • hick0029 says:

      Action research is a collaborative effort of individuals, teachers in this context, to recognize, evaluate, and improve upon practices or improve a given social or professional environment. Action research requires intellectual humility as well as a desire to improve an environment through hands on evaluation and practice. Through action research individuals engage in thoughtful analysis of their own methods or practices as well as the methods and practices of their peers.

    • silv3268 says:

      Action Research is something teachers and administration take on to investigate a topic that is pertinent to their professional development or the development of their students. Teachers and administrators—as individuals or in collaboration with others—complete all the steps of the research, such as choosing a topic, collecting, analyzing and reporting data. The goals of the research is for teachers and administrators to analyze their own methods, strategies, programs, etc., and find ways they can improve.

    • thom3640 says:

      Teacher action research is a tool for educators to assess and improve their own their methods and to address problems. Some key facets are that it is done by educators (not outside researchers), engages the community and it is “change-oriented –undertaken with the assumption that change is needed in a given context” (edchange.org).

      I spent some time reading on edchange.org about TAR and they have a section called TAR in Practice: An Illustration that helped me understand what exactly TAR looks like in an applied way. First, a problem is identified then a team evaluates the issue and creates recommendations for change based on this evaluation. The next step is action (make these changes happen) and then finally, reflect and consider new changes for the future.

    • mccl5095 says:

      T.A.R. is about teachers taking control of improving their classrooms through deliberate and recurring research. Teachers focus on a problem, they conduct research through practice, reflect on what worked and what didn’t, and then do it again with new understanding. Action research is an ever evolving method of improving classroom quality through trial and error. It puts the tools of research into the teachers’ hands, understanding that teachers every day are conducting experiments in the classroom with the intent of improving instruction. TAR takes into account that every classroom is different, and therefore, rarely will broad-based research hold the answers. Instead, teachers are given the power to cultivate their own school of inquiry with answers that work for them and their classrooms. In addition, TAR is a philosophy held by teachers who believe they can change school from within the system, rather than relying on the system to change. It is an empowering, engaging, and reflective methodology used to improve teaching and learning.

    • mick4682 says:

      TAR is a method for solving a problem. You may find shortcomings in your own teaching and through self assessment and improvement you try and find a solution. It may be a tool of some kind or simply changing the phrasing of a confusing lesson. TAR should be ongoing.

    • jesse says:

      Teacher Action Research, from what I have read, seems to be an ongoing, self-reflective assessment of one’s own methods, abilities, and outcomes, particularly in regard to success as an educator.

      Action Research, in general, seems to be a process of just looking at what you’re doing and conducting some form of research to determine whether you could be doing it more effectively. Applied to Teaching, this is just a way of continually checking your own progress, evaluating your own performance, and trying to improve your abilities.

    • ward4486 says:

      Teacher action research is a tool for educators to continually better their environments for not only learning but teaching. This process requires analysis of data that was gathered to find trends and problems that can than be continually improved over time.

      Action research is important in any community to actively find ways to refine and enhance techniques. Especially in the profession of teaching when you can never be too educated.

    • TJ says:

      Teacher Action Research (TAR) to me is a community focused group that helps both inside and outside of the classroom who stays up to date about relevant material to the field which is always in a constant state of change and they always keep individuals accountable by one another, peers, and the community that surrounds them. I particularly liked the story or Illustration about the school in northern Virginia. It reminded me of an exercise that we did in Annil’s class and how we worked around a problem that we had and used others around us to help come to a conclusion that would work for everyone. The particular situation benefited everyone involved; the students, faculty, administration, and the community of families. That is my definition with a story of positive change about them that will help me better remember them.

    • krop5065 says:

      Action research can be conducted by individual teachers or school communities as a whole. I would say that the “action” being examined in action research can refer to methods concerning content delivery, assessment, grading, communication, community involvement, etc. This form of research begins with the identification of a specific area for improvement, adjustment, or evaluation, then involves an observation of existing practices in that area. After observation has been recorded and discussed, teachers, administrators, all staff, or even students can weigh in on methods for improvement. Once new methods are implemented, the process begins again.

      Action research is significant because it focuses on the “now” and allows for continuous and collaborative growth.

    • Phoenix says:

      Action research is conducted by teachers “in-house” rather than outside researchers. It is undertaken to analyze issues or questions regarding the teaching of students as well as the social environment of schools, and come up with appropriate responses. Teachers conducting this type of research seek to expand their understanding of schools and students with the goal to improving, challenging, and enacting change locally.

    • pitt2892 says:

      Action research is essentially a checks-and-balances technique that teachers can use to evaluate their own educational practices in order to improve. It is a kind of research that can help to diagnose problems or weaknesses as educators and fix them.

    • kenn6317 says:

      Teacher Action Research is a technique used by teachers to take a step back from their normal strategies by reevaluating to see if what they’re doing in the classroom is effective. Its a way for the teacher to reflect on their lesson planning, delivery skills, in class assessments, etc, and provide self feedback. If a minor tweak can be made, the class will ultimately benefit.

    • emer3389 says:

      Teacher action research is a form of evaluation that is done by fellow educators to improve upon other teacher’s style. It is often used for problem solving within communities and appears to be more about improving the environment for the students and less about criticizing the teachers. It is also seems that it could be a great method for keeping the classroom current by eliminating outdated practices. When done correctly, I believe that it is a non-confrontational method of critical feedback that can improve schools within a community effectively.

    • norr4573 says:

      Teacher action research is a method of improving teaching methods and making classrooms or schools better. TAR is when a teacher comes up with a question of how to improve their classroom and then collects data and analyzes it to make informed decisions on their classroom practices. TAR is especially useful because the data collected is always relevant to the students in the classroom. Instead of taking someone else’s data and making decisions based off other students, teachers get to make choices based off data from their own students.

    • catl6633 says:

      Teacher Action Research is a practice to be in the practice of self-evaluation through researching what you are doing and how you could improve upon how you teach. For example sometimes the same lesson will be more effective or less effective depending on a variety of factors, like time of day, level of students, maturity of students, and how effective you are being as a teacher. Through TAR there is an ongoing learning by the teacher through research to be able to find ways to bridge the gap between more effective and less effective teaching methods, to improve what is already working and to replace what is not working with a new method that came from inquiry and may not have been found with out this research.

    • monn4522 says:

      Action research is a form of research that is conducted by those involved in the education system or by teachers themselves. The goal is to improve the quality of instruction being offered students. It also aims to prescribe a course of action which will not only allow a teacher to identify problems with their methods of instruction, but also enable them to move forward with a solution to identified issues. It is research that assists teachers in self-improvement.

    • bish4477 says:

      Action Research is the systematic study of ones practice. In the course of a teachers career there is constant opportunity to advance and learn through experiences, reflection, research and investigation. It is a continual and cyclical process of inquiry, study, sense-making and analysis, and improving ones practice.

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